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nullgas

English translation: zero (calibration) gas

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:nullgas
English translation:zero (calibration) gas
Entered by: foehnerk
Options:
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18:55 Jul 3, 2003
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / emmision control
German term or phrase: nullgas
Für alle anderen Komponenten wurden Null- und Prüfgasen aus Druckflaschen eingesetzt.
foehnerk
Local time: 02:56
zero gas
Explanation:
Yes, Eurodicautom is correct - zero gas and reference gas (or span gas). I have seen this quite a bit.

How to Obtain Calibration Gas in non-USA Locations - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
... 35 ppm CO in balance air; 200 ppm CO in balance air. Zero Gas: Zero Calibration
Gas (air*) for CO2 and CO sensor calibration. ... Zero Gas: Zero Calibration Gas (air). ...
www.tsi.com/iaq/non_us.shtml - 20k - Im Cache - Ähnliche Seiten

Accessories Toxalert, Inc. - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
... TOXCL2CALKIT Tox-CL 2 /ANA Calibration Kit [includes regulator/pressure gauge, on/off
valve; tank of zero gas (103 liter), tank of standard span gas (103 liter ...
www.toxalert.com/accessories/

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Note added at 1 hr 18 mins (2003-07-03 20:14:23 GMT)
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Inert or reactive isn\'t the point in question - Nullgas / zero gas is used for calibration of the zero value. For O2 analyzers, N2 is used. It contains 0% O2 and \"protects\" the detector from contact with oxygene. Nitrogene isn\'t inert, though.
Selected response from:

Klaus Herrmann
Germany
Local time: 08:56
Grading comment
Thanks Klaus (and everyone else) for your input. I liked the TSI and toxalert website references. In the context of my translation, calibration with a reference gas is clearly required.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3zero gas
Klaus Herrmann
5reference gas
EdithK
4clean or zero air
Fantutti
4 -1inert gas
Ramon Somoza


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
zero gas


Explanation:
Yes, Eurodicautom is correct - zero gas and reference gas (or span gas). I have seen this quite a bit.

How to Obtain Calibration Gas in non-USA Locations - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
... 35 ppm CO in balance air; 200 ppm CO in balance air. Zero Gas: Zero Calibration
Gas (air*) for CO2 and CO sensor calibration. ... Zero Gas: Zero Calibration Gas (air). ...
www.tsi.com/iaq/non_us.shtml - 20k - Im Cache - Ähnliche Seiten

Accessories Toxalert, Inc. - [ Diese Seite übersetzen ]
... TOXCL2CALKIT Tox-CL 2 /ANA Calibration Kit [includes regulator/pressure gauge, on/off
valve; tank of zero gas (103 liter), tank of standard span gas (103 liter ...
www.toxalert.com/accessories/

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 18 mins (2003-07-03 20:14:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Inert or reactive isn\'t the point in question - Nullgas / zero gas is used for calibration of the zero value. For O2 analyzers, N2 is used. It contains 0% O2 and \"protects\" the detector from contact with oxygene. Nitrogene isn\'t inert, though.

Klaus Herrmann
Germany
Local time: 08:56
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 3373
Grading comment
Thanks Klaus (and everyone else) for your input. I liked the TSI and toxalert website references. In the context of my translation, calibration with a reference gas is clearly required.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sven Petersson: See www.draeger.com
1 hr

agree  Fantutti
7 hrs

agree  John Jory
11 hrs
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
inert gas


Explanation:
Gas that does not cause/is subject to any chemical reactions

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Note added at 1 hr 51 mins (2003-07-03 20:47:37 GMT)
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As indicated in http://www.draeger-medical.com/MT/internet/EN/us/Library/app...
(referenced by Sven):


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Topic: Xenon

Where does xenon come from and how is it obtained?

The element was discovered in 1898 by W. Ramsay and M.W. Travers. By the 1950s studies had already proved the hypnotic effect of the noble gas xenon, and in 1951 xenon anaesthesia was performed for the first time. Xenon is a noble gas which is extracted as a side product of air liquefaction (Linde process). The gas is stored in cylinders similar to those used to store oxygen or nitrous oxide, though the addition of stabilizing agents, e.g. as with halothane, is not necessary. As xenon only makes up a very small percentage of air it is extremely expensive to extract, though the cost is less high if use can be made of the other gases which form during liquefaction.

What is so special about xenon?

Even in high concentrations xenon is completely non-toxic. The *chemically-inert gas* does not enter into any metabolic compounds in the body and therefore leaves behind no decomposition products in the human organism.



Ramon Somoza
Spain
Local time: 08:56
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 82

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alain POMART: yes, inert gas is somewhat the diluent for the test gas
32 mins
  -> That's why I think they test it separetely. Thank you, POMART

disagree  Klaus Herrmann: This is not about chemical reactions, but measuring the concentration of gas. See my note.
1 hr
  -> Not sure about which application is referred to.

disagree  Sven Petersson: See www.draeger.com
1 hr
  -> Sorry, Sven - I checked the site & could not find the reference. However, look in the same site: http://www.draeger-medical.com/MT/internet/EN/us/Library/app...
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
clean or zero air


Explanation:
GLOSS
... Clean air is also called "zero air" or "zero gas". ... The signal from the sensor
reverts to zero because the mixture in the air is too gas-rich to burn. ...
www.delphian.com/gloss.htm - 33k - Cached - Similar pages

Fantutti
Local time: 23:56
PRO pts in pair: 1023
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
reference gas


Explanation:
in this context. It's for testing, and one has Nullbier = zero beer, Nullfluid = zero fluid. That's the terminology of the art.

EdithK
Switzerland
Local time: 08:56
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 9176
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