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verrottet (and "Verrottung")

English translation: rotted compost

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:verrottet
English translation:rotted compost
Entered by: Vidmantas Stilius
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13:14 Jun 5, 2001
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
German term or phrase: verrottet (and "Verrottung")
Als weitere praktische Ausformulierung für den Begriff „verrottet“ in der Kompostdefinition wird vorgeschlagen, dass das Ausgangsmaterial ausser Holz visuell und geruchlich nicht mehr erkennbar sein soll.
Catherine Fischer
Switzerland
Local time: 12:06
rotted compost
Explanation:
Potatoes prefer a well-drained light soil, although you can grow them in clay.

Prepare the growing site by deep digging, i.e.. 25-30cms, removing any foreign matter from the soil, e.g.. stones or they will distort the potato and spoil the appearance of them. Dig in well rotted compost with some animal manure added, preferably sheep. With a garden bed of say, 7m long by 3m wide, I would dig in about 14 barrow loads of well-rotted compost and 4 barrow loads of sheep manure. Good preparation at this stage will pay off later. After this is done, let it settle for 3 to 4 weeks.

Always buy good quality seed potatoes from an accredited nursery. {Never use spuds from the supermarket - you run the risk of introducing plant diseases.}

The best time to plant the first crop is in March but it can be done as early as February. Its possible to have 5 crops a year - growing from March right through to November. They rarely need watering, the well-rotted compost retains enough moisture in the earth. If you have a very hot dry spell then you might water them, a little.

When you are ready to plant, dig a trench - spade depth. Plant the seed potatoes about 12 inches apart with the main shoot pointing upwards. Give a generous 3 ounces per square yard of balanced fertiliser, i.e.. GroBrite or bone meal then backfill with soil. If soil is very acid add a very light dusting of lime on top of the soil. Don't earth up the rows until the growth (humes) are about 25cms high. Harvest when this growth is about 45-50cms high. Optional extra - a sprinkle of slow release fertiliser a week or two after planting. Nothing else is needed until they are ready to dig.

Selected response from:

Vidmantas Stilius
Local time: 13:06
Grading comment
Thanks!


3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
narotted compost
Vidmantas Stilius
nadecayed/decaygcaddy
narotted
Alan Johnson


  

Answers


11 mins
rotted


Explanation:
and (the process of) rotting


    none required, long years of experience
Alan Johnson
Germany
Local time: 12:06
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 3388
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13 mins
decayed/decay


Explanation:
In terms of compost, both 'decay' or 'the rotting process' would be OK. The actual material would be 'decayed', 'rotted' or 'decomposed' (although the latter is more appropriate for multi-particled solids.

Good luck..

gcaddy
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:06
PRO pts in pair: 33
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins
rotted compost


Explanation:
Potatoes prefer a well-drained light soil, although you can grow them in clay.

Prepare the growing site by deep digging, i.e.. 25-30cms, removing any foreign matter from the soil, e.g.. stones or they will distort the potato and spoil the appearance of them. Dig in well rotted compost with some animal manure added, preferably sheep. With a garden bed of say, 7m long by 3m wide, I would dig in about 14 barrow loads of well-rotted compost and 4 barrow loads of sheep manure. Good preparation at this stage will pay off later. After this is done, let it settle for 3 to 4 weeks.

Always buy good quality seed potatoes from an accredited nursery. {Never use spuds from the supermarket - you run the risk of introducing plant diseases.}

The best time to plant the first crop is in March but it can be done as early as February. Its possible to have 5 crops a year - growing from March right through to November. They rarely need watering, the well-rotted compost retains enough moisture in the earth. If you have a very hot dry spell then you might water them, a little.

When you are ready to plant, dig a trench - spade depth. Plant the seed potatoes about 12 inches apart with the main shoot pointing upwards. Give a generous 3 ounces per square yard of balanced fertiliser, i.e.. GroBrite or bone meal then backfill with soil. If soil is very acid add a very light dusting of lime on top of the soil. Don't earth up the rows until the growth (humes) are about 25cms high. Harvest when this growth is about 45-50cms high. Optional extra - a sprinkle of slow release fertiliser a week or two after planting. Nothing else is needed until they are ready to dig.




    Reference: http://www.gardensonline.com.au/GardenShed/Articles/ArticleD...
Vidmantas Stilius
Local time: 13:06
Native speaker of: Native in LithuanianLithuanian
PRO pts in pair: 154
Grading comment
Thanks!

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