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Gemütlichkeit

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20:02 Oct 21, 2007
This question was closed without grading. Reason: Errant question

German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Tourism & Travel
German term or phrase: Gemütlichkeit
1 MUNICH. After much tire-kicking, data-sifting and deliberation, Munich emerged as Monocle magazine's most liveable city in the world. A winning combination of investment in infrastructure, high-quality housing, low crime, liberal politics, strong media and general feeling of Gemütlichkeit make it a city that should inspire others.

My question: is Gemütlichkeit already an English word now?
Bin Tiede
Germany
Local time: 06:59
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Summary of answers provided
4 +10Gemütlichkeit [ease]
Stephen Sadie
4 +2s.u.
Nicholas Krivenko
4 +2easy going
Vere Barzilai
5 +1cosiness
moser.ilja
5gemutlichkeitSibylle Gray
3 +1hospitality
Lori Dendy-Molz
3 +1comfort level (Gemuetlichkeit)
Raghunathan
2satisfaction
Michael Harris
4 -2Comfort
Kcda


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
s.u.


Explanation:
Of course it is not. However, there is a trend to use words that from other languages that have become quite common within certain circles and/or among people with a certain level of education. Since this looks like a tourist guide of sorts and is aimed at Munich, I am not surprised to see a German word there. Furthermore, it very much depends on the origin of the text at hand: US English tends to use more foreign words than the British variety. You surely came across a "doppeöga(e)nger" and much more. The spelling is often appalling but the sense remains the same. US writers of popular literature use them very often.

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Note added at 16 mins (2007-10-21 20:18:23 GMT)
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Sorry, I meant "However, there is a trend to use words from other languages..." The second "that" was a mistake.

Nicholas Krivenko
Ireland
Local time: 05:59
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters: OK, I'll agree with you, though it looks more like an explanation than an answer :-) (You mean Doppelga(e)nger, don't you?)
2 hrs
  -> Of course, this was a typo. The way the question is worded it sounded like a request for an explanation rather than a translation. Thanks in any case!

agree  sylvie malich: Very helpful explanation!
12 hrs
  -> Wow! Thank you. I seldom offer references: it's time consuming and often unnecessary but the info is always based on either a sound source or comes from that huge hard disk we call brain. I have a reference in this case though: "Lucifer Code" by M. Cordy
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49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
Gemütlichkeit [ease]


Explanation:
self-explanatory and an attempt to explain a term which actually cannot be properly translated

Stephen Sadie
Germany
Local time: 06:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 41

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Kcda: I somehow disagree with "cannot be translated properly". It means comfort and words like ease/relaxing/comfortable/comforting so on and forth are correct as similar ones./ No dictionary needed here (it is a basic word)!? ... No worries at all :)
10 mins
  -> absolutely disagree..sorry..

agree  JohnGBell: I would agree, leave Gemütlichkeit in.
28 mins
  -> thanks john

agree  Trudy Peters: Yes, leave it in German (without explanations)
50 mins
  -> thanks trudy

neutral  Nicholas Krivenko: Now HERE I am saying you could have agreed. :-) No hard feelings, we are all ambitious.
1 hr
  -> I think my answer is clearer and honestly hadn't seen yours either

agree  xxxDr.G.MD
3 hrs
  -> thanks gerhard

agree  Valeska Nygren
5 hrs
  -> thanks valeska

agree  Maki Ahn: :)
9 hrs
  -> thanks maki

agree  Sibylle Gray: As stated below, leave the term, it's usually understood in the English speaking world (I'd simply substitute "ü" with "u" or "ue").
9 hrs
  -> thanks, that's the neatest way - just adding a comment to the existing answer..and also a valid point

agree  Gillian Scheibelein: I'd leave it in too, but maybe without an explanation as it is untranslatable. After all this is marketing/advertising hype which no one takes seriously anyway. It gives a nice individualistic German touch to the text, whether Munich is Gemütlich or not
10 hrs
  -> beg to differ, the reader must surely understand!

agree  xxxAnglo-German: and Gillian, I don't find Munich gemütlich at all...
11 hrs
  -> thanks anlo-german

agree  KARIN ISBELL
18 hrs
  -> thanks karin

agree  Cetacea: "gemütlichkeit" (spelled exactly like that, with an "ü") is included in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, and not even among "foreign words & phrases", but as part of the English language.
20 hrs
  -> thanks, but nonetheless I prefer to explain in squre brackets for the many possible readers who are not au fait with the term
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
satisfaction


Explanation:
just a suggestion because when your happy, you are also satisfied?

Michael Harris
Germany
Local time: 06:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Comfort


Explanation:
To be honest I am trying to get an easy point here! :)
1. The rendering of Gemütlichkeit is comfort 101% unless interpreted indirectly.

2. It is for sure not of German language origin!!!

3. Sometimes people use words from other languages to express things expecting others to understand it. To the best of my knowledge most of the English speaking crowd in this world would not know this word in German. It is not one of those internationlized and accepted cliche words. Here is an example: the word I just used "cliche" (I am not sure of my spelling). It is not fully English but has already been integrated into it. The term in your question is not one of these type of words at all!




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Note added at 53 mins (2007-10-21 20:55:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Explanation:

2. I meant this other way round = "...not of German language..."

I wrote it in a haste and I exaggerated the exclamation marks to make it clear it is German and has nothing to do with English. As said, in the haste a certain amount of so to say, sarcasm sank in!




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2007-10-22 01:36:25 GMT)
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A winning combination of investment in infrastructure, high-quality housing, low crime, liberal politics, strong media and "A" general feeling of "COMFORT" make "THIS" a city that should inspire others.


I have addded the three things (words) ommited one "it"from the askers original sentence. In capital letters I tried to show how that sentence would work in English absolutely perfectly. No need to divert from good old English and use foreign words like "Gemütlichkeit". I think some colleagues are expecting the readership to be like them and hence are well endowned with language skills and automatically understand totally uncommon foreign words. Incidentally it should be in quotation marks and reflect it is of foreign origin. I do not see how it is supposed to be very common as is and hard to translate if one would want to do so. It is a pseudo adapted word nothing else. EXAMPLE: the word I intentionally used "Pseudo" can be used in both languages not words like "Gemütlichkeit". Especially another striking fact: the letter "Ü" is not English. Hence would be impossible to alliterate in writing and in speech awfull to pronounce.




Kcda
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TurkishTurkish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Nicholas Krivenko: Sorry! ABSOLUTELY disagree. I came across this term at least dozens of times incorporated into purely English texts.
1 hr
  -> The English language does not have "Ü" in it just for starters. You must be joking! If it was incorporated properly it should be in " " marks. Incidentally because it is used "dozen" or even more it does not become English. Especially not "purely".

disagree  Trudy Peters: Agree with Nicholas. Nobody said it was of German origin. It's as well known as "Gesundheit," when someone sneezes. // I'm not equating the meaning of Gem. with Ges. I'm just saying that both words are often used in English.
2 hrs
  -> Seit wann is "gemütlichkeit" gleich "gesundheit". Sogar "gemütszustand" ist nicht dass selbe wie "gemütlichkeit" I do not unserstand your comment at all! Gemütlich/keit= Comfort/ing. It is the grammar which is tough nothing else :)

disagree  Cetacea: "gemütlichkeit" (spelled exactly like that, with an "ü") is included in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, and not even among "foreign words & phrases", but as part of the English language.
21 hrs
  -> The question has been closed. The reason: errant question. I do not know if I need to say much else. :)

agree  Veronica Prpic Uhing
22 hrs
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
comfort level (Gemuetlichkeit)


Explanation:
I don't think many english speakers are familiar with Gemuetlichkeit. Our objective is to suggest a translation which is as close to the original as possible which need not necessarily be a 100% match.

I have been translating this as "comfort level". We can use "Gemuetlichkeit" in brackets after comfort level if it is desired.

Comfort level is a familiar term used in Tourism & Travel industry.

Please see this link:

http://www.positivearticles.com/Article/Accomodation-In-Nort...

Raghunathan
Local time: 10:29
Native speaker of: Tamil
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kcda: Yes it is too do with comfort levels. Hence I used comfort for short. It depends how you are going to render the sentence. I do not see how it can be Eng. at all regardless of numerous occurences. As simple as that! :)
11 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
gemutlichkeit


Explanation:
Used in the U.S.
I've seen it spelled both ways, with "u" and with "ue", but according to the m-w online, it is "gemutlichkeit".
And since it is a text about Munich, just leave the German term.

HTH

Sibylle.


    Reference: http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/gemuetlichkeit
Sibylle Gray
United States
Local time: 00:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Stephen Sadie: please read other earlier similar responses, it was not a question of spelling!
2 hrs
  -> Thank you Stephen. I understand that the spelling was not a problem; I just wanted to clarify that I haven't seen it spelled with a "ü" in English (I reckon you could say I did it for future reference, a little add-on :o).

disagree  Kcda: Taken from your reference link (Webster): Etymology: "German, from gemütlich + -keit, alteration of -heit -hood" No way near an English word at all. It might be incorporated into texts but who on earth would understand it! Who said it is just spelling!
10 hrs
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
hospitality


Explanation:
...one more option that could work here. While 'gemutlichkeit' may be used in some English texts by writers wishing to exhibit their inside knowledge of the country, from my experience it is not widely understood among native speakers. While I would definitely leave the term in, I would not use it in a text intended for a general audience without a brief explanation. Why risk annoying readers?

Lori Dendy-Molz
Germany
Local time: 07:00
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kcda: I fully agree with your explanation and approach to the issue. It is 101% not English and an incorporation into a text requires " " even if it is spotable immediately as a foreign word. Comfort/ease/hospitality depending on sentence structure are good :)
7 hrs
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
easy going


Explanation:
believe me, I know Munich, it`s not a very gemuetliche Stadt, but if yoy want it, ok, I would say it is a easy going city

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Note added at 10 hrs (2007-10-22 06:56:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

wai, wai, wai - mistakes - aN easy going city of course

Vere Barzilai
Israel
Local time: 08:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Hermann: This reflects the meaning pretty well
1 hr
  -> thanks

agree  grisslee: That was also my firsdt choice
1 day2 hrs
  -> thanks
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
cosiness


Explanation:
At least, Cassel's New German Dictionary gives this equivalent,
and it was the bible of the British Control Commission in Germany

moser.ilja
Local time: 07:00
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Veronica Prpic Uhing: That's it!
10 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Oct 22, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldOther » Marketing


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