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Gleiskilometrierung

English translation: route distance; track distance.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Gleiskilometrierung
English translation:route distance; track distance.
Entered by: Jane Luther
Options:
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12:00 Nov 25, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping / overhead line inspection
German term or phrase: Gleiskilometrierung
This is taken from a fact sheet on an overhead line inspection system, this particular section on video surveying:

"Die einzelnen Bilder des Videos sind exakt mit der Gleiskilometrierung verknüpft."

I do know what the Gleiskilometrierung is, it's the kilometre markers along the track. But how do I best translate this? I've read the corresponding forum entries on Kilometrierung, particularly Johannes Gleim's "line mileage" (UIC terminology), but have also found "track chainage" used elsewhere (e.g. http://www.laser-rail.co.uk/en/Case-Studies/Docklands-Light-... and http://www.severn-partnership.co.uk/sector_services_signal_s... As I'm not a rail specialist (I'm learning fast!), I'd like to know whether these terms are interchangeable, or whether I'm actually just assuming that track chainage is the same as Gleiskilometrierung when it's actually something completely different. You see, track chainage would fit better into my translation as it currently stands...
Jane Luther
Germany
Local time: 22:47
route distance; track distance.
Explanation:
Personally, I'd avoid both miles and kilometres. As the video shots your machine takes are precisely interfaced with the location of any fault which may be found, I think you have to use distance here as trackside markings are either every 100 metres or (in the UK, at least) every 1/4 mile. And if the manufacturer is trying to sell into the UK market, he can't very well use kilometres in any event, can he?

The "chain" referred to is 22 yards, thus 1/80th. of a mile. The reason this is used in the UK is that it's more precise than 100 metres, and when lengthmen used to have to walk their "lenth of track" inspecting it, it was easier to find a reported fault when it was quoted to an accuracy of 22 yards. The Working TimeTable always showed route distances in this way; whether it still does, I'm not sure. I haven't worked with one for almost 20 years now.
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 22:47
Grading comment
Thanks very much. Your comments were very useful, and you're quite right, of course, as to the precision of the surveying equipment. Track distance therefore made perfect sense in the context and I used it throughout the text.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1route distance; track distance.David Moore
3 -1Track mileageDolores Vázquez
2kilometre markings
Alan Johnson
Summary of reference entries provided
have never met chainage in a rail context (common in roads)polyglot45

  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
kilometre markings


Explanation:
I have a number of glossaries containing this term, all different :-(
I have kilometre marking, as above, and kilometre mileage, also amusing, in its way. How about 'kilometrisation'?
Strangely, I can't find the entry in the UIC dictionary, which I have found in the past to often be suboptimal, neither 'Gleiskilometrierung' nor simply 'Kilometrierung'.

Alan Johnson
Germany
Local time: 22:47
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 25
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Track mileage


Explanation:
An option.


    Reference: http://iate.europa.eu/iatediff/SearchByQuery.do
    Reference: http://christophe.lachenal.free.fr/francais/voyage/multilang...
Dolores Vázquez
Native speaker of: Native in GalicianGalician, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Alan Johnson: I don't really think this will work. If the 'Gleiskilometrierung' is logically given in kilometres, you can hardly call it track mileage, can you?
5 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
route distance; track distance.


Explanation:
Personally, I'd avoid both miles and kilometres. As the video shots your machine takes are precisely interfaced with the location of any fault which may be found, I think you have to use distance here as trackside markings are either every 100 metres or (in the UK, at least) every 1/4 mile. And if the manufacturer is trying to sell into the UK market, he can't very well use kilometres in any event, can he?

The "chain" referred to is 22 yards, thus 1/80th. of a mile. The reason this is used in the UK is that it's more precise than 100 metres, and when lengthmen used to have to walk their "lenth of track" inspecting it, it was easier to find a reported fault when it was quoted to an accuracy of 22 yards. The Working TimeTable always showed route distances in this way; whether it still does, I'm not sure. I haven't worked with one for almost 20 years now.

David Moore
Local time: 22:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 764
Grading comment
Thanks very much. Your comments were very useful, and you're quite right, of course, as to the precision of the surveying equipment. Track distance therefore made perfect sense in the context and I used it throughout the text.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ken Cox: My thought as well -- it's unlikely that the imagery is linked directly to the kilometre markings, and as you say, the key idea is that what you see in the imagery can be localised accurately.
15 mins
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Reference comments


16 mins
Reference: have never met chainage in a rail context (common in roads)

Reference information:
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/english_to_german/geography/685709...

Principles of Road Measurement
2 Jan 2003 ... Chainage - the location along a road from a start point (in m). ... Thus, the survey chainage increases when driving away from the start ...
www.romdas.com/technical/tec-rdms.ht

That said, maybe it is the new in word

polyglot45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 54

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
neutral  David Moore: Maybe you don't specialise in raiwlays - or even railways?? The WTT on British Rail was always printed with miles and chains.
37 mins
  -> Well, I do not in fact specialise in raiwlays......
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