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parados

English translation: http://www.historyforkids.org/greekciv/arts/drama/theaters/ruben3.htm

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Greek term or phrase:parados
English translation:http://www.historyforkids.org/greekciv/arts/drama/theaters/ruben3.htm
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23:22 Jan 30, 2002
Greek to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Greek term or phrase: parados
parados is an ancient greek term used in theater
beachbum
entrance for the spectators/audience
Explanation:
I think this might be what you are looking for.

HTH

Sheila

http://www.historyforkids.org/greekciv/arts/drama/theaters/r...


Today's proscenium is the what separates the audience from the stage. It is the frame around the stage that makes it look like the action is taking place in a picture frame. Greek theaters also had entrances for the audience called parodoi. The paradoi (plural of parados) were tall arches that came out from the sides of the stage, through which the audience entered. By the end of the 5th century BC, around the time of the Peloponnesian War, the skene, the back wall, was two stories high. The upper story was called the episkenion. Some theaters also had a raised speaking place on the orchestra called the logeion.


http://www.atsweb.neu.edu/theatre.history/intro/IntroGreece....

       
          Parados:
Greek theatres had no separation between themselves and the surrounding land, they just flowed into the hill. There was a path, however, between the seat in each row that is closest to the skene and the skene itself.

A symbolic boundary between the theatre and the surrounding area was created by placing a simple lintel on two posts, one at the corner of the skene, and one next to the theatron. This is the parados (plural - paradoi).

The spectators entered the theatre through the paradoi. (The Theatre of Dionysus at Athens was so large that there was a second access near the back of the theatron.)

The entrances and exits of the chorus were always made through the paradoi.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-30 23:53:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Panayiota pointed out, the word should be written as parodos and not parados. I found more information about these parodos or entrances/exits. Hope this helps you. Sheila


* One serious problem faced by all modern directors is how to make Greek drama conform to modern stage spaces.  This problem was accute in the case of 19th-century theaters, when excessive devotion to the idea of the inviolable proscenium posed a problem for the placement of the chorus.  In the photograph below, one sees how the ancient Athenian theater of Dionysus is largely focused on the orkhestra, the \"dancing ground\" occupied by the chorus after their entrance (parodos).  Though most of the stone ruins in this picture are Hellenistic or Roman in origin, the basic shape of the theater conforms to that of the 5th-century BCE performance space used by the great tragedians, including Sophocles.

http://www.clas.ufl.edu/ipsa/journal/articles/psyart1999/oed...

The Greek Theater

Key Parts of  the Theater (entries from the Perseus Encyclopedia)

* theatron  (the theater itself)
* orchestra (the Chorus\' dancing place)
* parodos (theaters entrances and exits)
* skene (the backdrop / stage building)

http://www.skidmore.edu/academics/classics/courses/1998fall/...

Entrances

The way the actors entered the stage also told much about what is going on. For example, in most theatres there were one or three entrances. There were normally two parodos, or entrances. If the hypocrits came in from the right parodos, then they had just come from a city or port. If they came in from the left parodi, then they had just come from the fields or abroad.

http://www.richeast.org/htwm/Greeks/theatre/Directions.html
 
               
Selected response from:

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 18:34
Grading comment
muchas gracias
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Παρωδός
Betty Revelioti
4 +2entrance for the spectators/audience
Sheila Hardie


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Παρωδός


Explanation:
It is parodos not parados.
parodos = Παρωδός = parodo's

Betty Revelioti
Greece
Local time: 19:34
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 214

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheila Hardie
13 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Maria Nicholas
34 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Joanna5
40 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
entrance for the spectators/audience


Explanation:
I think this might be what you are looking for.

HTH

Sheila

http://www.historyforkids.org/greekciv/arts/drama/theaters/r...


Today's proscenium is the what separates the audience from the stage. It is the frame around the stage that makes it look like the action is taking place in a picture frame. Greek theaters also had entrances for the audience called parodoi. The paradoi (plural of parados) were tall arches that came out from the sides of the stage, through which the audience entered. By the end of the 5th century BC, around the time of the Peloponnesian War, the skene, the back wall, was two stories high. The upper story was called the episkenion. Some theaters also had a raised speaking place on the orchestra called the logeion.


http://www.atsweb.neu.edu/theatre.history/intro/IntroGreece....

       
          Parados:
Greek theatres had no separation between themselves and the surrounding land, they just flowed into the hill. There was a path, however, between the seat in each row that is closest to the skene and the skene itself.

A symbolic boundary between the theatre and the surrounding area was created by placing a simple lintel on two posts, one at the corner of the skene, and one next to the theatron. This is the parados (plural - paradoi).

The spectators entered the theatre through the paradoi. (The Theatre of Dionysus at Athens was so large that there was a second access near the back of the theatron.)

The entrances and exits of the chorus were always made through the paradoi.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-30 23:53:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Panayiota pointed out, the word should be written as parodos and not parados. I found more information about these parodos or entrances/exits. Hope this helps you. Sheila


* One serious problem faced by all modern directors is how to make Greek drama conform to modern stage spaces.  This problem was accute in the case of 19th-century theaters, when excessive devotion to the idea of the inviolable proscenium posed a problem for the placement of the chorus.  In the photograph below, one sees how the ancient Athenian theater of Dionysus is largely focused on the orkhestra, the \"dancing ground\" occupied by the chorus after their entrance (parodos).  Though most of the stone ruins in this picture are Hellenistic or Roman in origin, the basic shape of the theater conforms to that of the 5th-century BCE performance space used by the great tragedians, including Sophocles.

http://www.clas.ufl.edu/ipsa/journal/articles/psyart1999/oed...

The Greek Theater

Key Parts of  the Theater (entries from the Perseus Encyclopedia)

* theatron  (the theater itself)
* orchestra (the Chorus\' dancing place)
* parodos (theaters entrances and exits)
* skene (the backdrop / stage building)

http://www.skidmore.edu/academics/classics/courses/1998fall/...

Entrances

The way the actors entered the stage also told much about what is going on. For example, in most theatres there were one or three entrances. There were normally two parodos, or entrances. If the hypocrits came in from the right parodos, then they had just come from a city or port. If they came in from the left parodi, then they had just come from the fields or abroad.

http://www.richeast.org/htwm/Greeks/theatre/Directions.html
 
               

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 18:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
muchas gracias

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jfrot
7 hrs
  -> thanks:)

agree  Egmont
337 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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