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e pluribus unum

English translation: "one out of many" [unity from combination of many parts]

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Greek term or phrase:e pluribus unum
English translation:"one out of many" [unity from combination of many parts]
Entered by: Annie Robberecht, C. Tr.
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13:58 Apr 17, 2001
Greek to English translations [Non-PRO]
Greek term or phrase: e pluribus unum
It is on money
"one out of many" = unity from combination of many parts
Explanation:
e pluribus unum
'one out of many'; unity from combination of many parts.

The original meaning has changed, though.
Some interesting thoughts (Stephen H. Legomsky):

But “e pluribus unum” actually means two very different things. To most of us, this phrase refers to millions of individual Americans coming together in a common effort, uniting into a single people. In the early days, though, the phrase more often referred to the various states coming together to form a common union.

[Legomsky] uses the phrase “e pluribus unum” in the modern sense, to describe the notion of individuals banding together as a single community, in pursuit of common goals.
-- Southern Illinois University Law Journal
http://www.law.siu.edu/lawjour/21_1/legomsky.htm


Selected response from:

Annie Robberecht, C. Tr.
Local time: 22:20
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na"one out of many" = unity from combination of many partsAnnie Robberecht, C. Tr.
naOut of Many, One
Alex Seidanis
na"One from many" or "One from many parts."
Vesna Zivcic


  

Answers


17 mins
"One from many" or "One from many parts."


Explanation:
US national mottos: E Pluribus Unum and In God We Trust
... The original motto of the United States was secular. "E Pluribus Unum" is Latin for "One from many" or "One from many parts." It refers to the welding of a ...





    Reference: http://www.religioustolerance.org/nat_mott.htm
Vesna Zivcic
Local time: 22:20
Native speaker of: Croatian
PRO pts in pair: 4
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2 hrs
Out of Many, One


Explanation:
Although this is Latin, not Greek, here's my contribution:

The first Great Seal committee (1776) recommended the Latin phrase, "E pluribus unum." Consultant and artist Pierre Du Simitiθre chose the motto, and his design is essentially an expression of this theme.

It translates as: "Out of many, one" — an obvious reference to the thirteen colonies united into one nation, as symbolized by the shield on the eagle's breast. As explained in the official description of the Great Seal: The shield is composed of thirteen vertical stripes that "represent the several states all joined in one solid compact entire, supporting a Chief, which unites the whole & represents Congress. The Motto alludes to this union."

This motto was well known to literate Americans of the 18th century. It appeared in the Gentleman's Magazine, published in London from 1731 to 1922. The legend "E Pluribus Unum" was used on the title pages printed for the annual volumes which contained a collection of the year's twelve monthly issues of the magazine. (This is an interesting incidence of the number thirteen: twelve publications bound together by the thirteenth.) The motto also had been associated with the image of a hand holding a bouquet of flowers.

Symbols of unity were abundant during the 1770s and '80s, especially on continental currency. One bill depicted a golden candlestick with thirteen lighted candles giving "one and the same light." An eight-dollar note had a harp with thirteen strings and a Latin motto meaning, "The larger are in harmony with the smaller."

The legendary "Fugio" coins and currency, designed by Benjamin Franklin in 1776, depict a circle of thirteen interlocking rings surrounding the motto, "We Are One." On the obverse, a sun dial and the word Fugio (I fly). Underneath is the phrase, "Mind Your Business."

HTH

Alex Seidanis


    Reference: http://www.greatseal.com/symbols/unum.html
Alex Seidanis
Local time: 23:20
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 5
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8 hrs
"one out of many" = unity from combination of many parts


Explanation:
e pluribus unum
'one out of many'; unity from combination of many parts.

The original meaning has changed, though.
Some interesting thoughts (Stephen H. Legomsky):

But “e pluribus unum” actually means two very different things. To most of us, this phrase refers to millions of individual Americans coming together in a common effort, uniting into a single people. In the early days, though, the phrase more often referred to the various states coming together to form a common union.

[Legomsky] uses the phrase “e pluribus unum” in the modern sense, to describe the notion of individuals banding together as a single community, in pursuit of common goals.
-- Southern Illinois University Law Journal
http://www.law.siu.edu/lawjour/21_1/legomsky.htm





    Internet
Annie Robberecht, C. Tr.
Local time: 22:20
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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