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10:24 Mar 12, 2001
Hebrew to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Hebrew term or phrase: breath
I want to know what the Hebrew term for "breath" is in English. Like if you were meditating or praying, and were breathing in and out. What would the Hebrew word for this "breath" be?
Charmaine
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Summary of answers provided
naneshimah OR she'ifat ruachRobert Jackson
naBreath
Suzan
nain exchange for my 0Albert Golub
naLinshom
Michal Circolone
nasomething like "rouah" can't write itAlbert Golub


  

Answers


5 mins
something like "rouah" can't write it


Explanation:
used for god's breath at least, the cosmic
hope it helps

Albert Golub
Local time: 08:45
Native speaker of: French

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Fuad Yahya

Astrid Elke Witte
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29 mins
Linshom


Explanation:
To breath=Linshom
לנשום

Good luck!


    Alcalay, The Complete English-Hebrew Dictionary
Michal Circolone
United States
Local time: 00:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in pair: 48

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Fuad Yahya
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1 hr
in exchange for my 0


Explanation:
to breathe don't forget the "e"
that's for the person who generously granted this 0
he may be right, i made it clear i meant God's Breath
good luck

Albert Golub
Local time: 08:45
Native speaker of: French

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Fuad Yahya
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1 hr
Breath


Explanation:
Breath is "neshima" in Hebrew. To breathe is "linshom".


    Shimshon Inbal Heb-Eng, Eng-Heb Dictionary
Suzan
United States
Local time: 02:45
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in pair: 204

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Fuad Yahya
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5 days
neshimah OR she'ifat ruach


Explanation:
The first comes from the root N-Sh-M, which simply means "to breathe".

She'ifah (w/o the final -t if it stands alone) means more "inhale", rather than breathe in general. THe root is Sh-'-p. I included "ruach" after it, because this is how it is given in the Bantam-Megiddo Heb & Eng Dict. But beware that "ruach" does not mean "breath" primarily, but "wind". It only means "breath" in a derived sense.

Gen. 2:7b reads "weyippakh be'appayw nishmat khayyim" "And (God) blew into his nostrils a breath of life." The first word is a form of the root n-p-kh, which doesn't mean "breathe", but rather blow. (Even though many Eng. translations do in fact render it "breathe".) "Nishmat" is a form of "neshamah" which in turn is related to "neshimah". This latter refers more to the act of breathing, while "neshamah" means more the air which is breathed.

For the record, I was a professional Bible translator for 10 yrs.


    Bantam-Megiddo Hebrew & English Dictionary
    Hebrew-English Lexicon (Zondervan)
Robert Jackson
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