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mezonot

English translation: Alimony

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Hebrew term or phrase:mezonot
English translation:Alimony
Entered by: snatalieg
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14:32 Jan 30, 2004
Hebrew to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Hebrew term or phrase: mezonot
In a "hazmanah btvi'ah l'mezonot" can mezonot be translated as child support or is it always alimony? (The client wants me to translate it as child support but that is usually mezonot k'tin??) Thanks
snatalieg
Local time: 15:51
Alimony
Explanation:
It is --NOT-- child support. The client can tell you what they think it --should-- have said, but they can't tell you what it --does-- say or how it --should-- be translated: that is the translator's job.
If there is a mistake and it should have said something different, let the client change it after it's left your hands. You cannot - and should not - put your name to anything that is manifestly untrue (all the more so, of course, if you are going to have this notarized or whatever; but even if you are not having it notarized).
Mezonot comes from 'food', and so does 'alimony' (cf. alimentary canal). It has nothing whatsoever to do with children per se, because if the wife has no income of her own, the husband has to pay her a regular income so she can eat (well, these days sometimes it's the other way around). Children do not come into this arrangement.
There can be an increase in the amount for children; or there can be a separate section for children; but mezonot is simply alimony - for the wife. Baduk.
Selected response from:

Eynat
Grading comment
That is exactly my sentiment and I do have to have it notarized. Thanks for the confirmation
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1Alimony
Eynat
4 +1alimony or child support
Tal Ganani
4child support
judithyf


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
alimony or child support


Explanation:
Child support = mezonot yeladim
Alimony = mezonot bat zug

Mezonot could be either of the two if not specified.


    Reference: http://www.b-ver.com/upload/iss/dic.html
Tal Ganani
United States
Local time: 15:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Eynat: But alimony is the more general, so would apply here. See below.
1 hr

agree  Baruch Avidar
2 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
child support


Explanation:
You are right that child support should be mezonot ktin. However, if the client is sure that is what he/she wants, I think you will have to go along with it, unless your broader context clearly indicates otherwise.

judithyf
Local time: 22:51
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 852

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jonathan Spector
49 mins

disagree  Eynat: Absolutely not. You cannot translate what the client tells you it should have said, only what it does say. See below.
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Alimony


Explanation:
It is --NOT-- child support. The client can tell you what they think it --should-- have said, but they can't tell you what it --does-- say or how it --should-- be translated: that is the translator's job.
If there is a mistake and it should have said something different, let the client change it after it's left your hands. You cannot - and should not - put your name to anything that is manifestly untrue (all the more so, of course, if you are going to have this notarized or whatever; but even if you are not having it notarized).
Mezonot comes from 'food', and so does 'alimony' (cf. alimentary canal). It has nothing whatsoever to do with children per se, because if the wife has no income of her own, the husband has to pay her a regular income so she can eat (well, these days sometimes it's the other way around). Children do not come into this arrangement.
There can be an increase in the amount for children; or there can be a separate section for children; but mezonot is simply alimony - for the wife. Baduk.

Eynat
PRO pts in pair: 94
Grading comment
That is exactly my sentiment and I do have to have it notarized. Thanks for the confirmation

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Baruch Avidar
1 hr
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