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Hadassah

English translation: Myrtle or Esther

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11:46 Aug 28, 2000
Hebrew to English translations [Non-PRO]
Hebrew term or phrase: Hadassah
In the Ben Yihuda dictionary that I own, the closest translation to this word is "myrtle". It is only in the masculine. I do not know if this is the correct translation as the name "Hadassah" is in the feminine.
Rivi
English translation:Myrtle or Esther
Explanation:
The additional "Heh" on the end of the Hadas makes it feminine,this plant can be either masculine or feminine. It is used as a female name, look in The Book of Esther, chapter 2 verse 7. Hadassah is the hebrew name of the persian named Esther, (Astara or the like)so it has been around for quite some time.
Selected response from:

Eric Isaacson
Israel
Local time: 23:12
Grading comment
Thank you for the translation; I had forgotten that Esther's Hebrew name was Hadassah. Your explanation reminded me and was very helpful. Toda Rabah!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naMyrtleJohn Kinory
naMyrtle or EstherEric Isaacson
naHadassah
Michal Circolone


  

Answers


26 mins
Hadassah


Explanation:
Myrtle does translate what "hadas" mean (as a plant). The heh at the end of the word provides the feminine conotation.

However, while hadas could be translated to myrtle, Hadassah serves as a name (be it a person's name, the hospital's name which is located in Jerusalem, or the name of the Jewish Women's Organization) and therefore should remain as is.

Good Luck!



    Reference: http://www.babylon.com
Michal Circolone
United States
Local time: 14:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in pair: 48

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
John Kinory
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2 days 1 hr
Myrtle or Esther


Explanation:
The additional "Heh" on the end of the Hadas makes it feminine,this plant can be either masculine or feminine. It is used as a female name, look in The Book of Esther, chapter 2 verse 7. Hadassah is the hebrew name of the persian named Esther, (Astara or the like)so it has been around for quite some time.

Eric Isaacson
Israel
Local time: 23:12
PRO pts in pair: 36
Grading comment
Thank you for the translation; I had forgotten that Esther's Hebrew name was Hadassah. Your explanation reminded me and was very helpful. Toda Rabah!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
John Kinory
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2 days 4 hrs
Myrtle


Explanation:
The heh at the end of Hadassah _suggests_ it is feminine - this is only a rule-of-thumb in Hebrew, not an absolute indication.
Whether a particular noun in Hebrew is masculine or feminine can cause a headache even to fluent speakers - why should a table be masculine and not feminine? Why is a way feminine?
Hadas happens to be masculine. It so happens that a feminine name was coined from it. It can be 'worse' in English; think about daisy: the flower has no gender, but as far as I know, only girls are called Daisy :-)
Yoni

John Kinory
Local time: 21:12
PRO pts in pair: 4
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