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gevault

English translation: Oh no!

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20:44 May 21, 2000
Hebrew to English translations [PRO]
Hebrew term or phrase: gevault
oy gevault
self
English translation:Oh no!
Explanation:
This term is actually Yiddish, not Hebrew, and is an exclamation one makes when in distress (or sometimes when frustrated). It is usually spelled GEVALT, not GEVAUlT, by the way.

It usually means something along the lines of "Oh no!", and is used as such when something bad happens (for example, if you have been having a bad day already, and your car breaks down, you might put your head against the steering wheel and say "Oy, gevalt.").

It can also be used to express disgust or frustration, as in "throwing up one's hands" (for example, after an hour of going around in circles with an argument, you might give up on arguing any further and storm out of the room throwing an "Oy, gevalt" over your shoulder -- sort of a "this situation is hopeless; I give up.").
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musici
United States
Local time: 04:57
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naDepends on context:_pro
naOh no!musici


  

Answers


12 mins
Oh no!


Explanation:
This term is actually Yiddish, not Hebrew, and is an exclamation one makes when in distress (or sometimes when frustrated). It is usually spelled GEVALT, not GEVAUlT, by the way.

It usually means something along the lines of "Oh no!", and is used as such when something bad happens (for example, if you have been having a bad day already, and your car breaks down, you might put your head against the steering wheel and say "Oy, gevalt.").

It can also be used to express disgust or frustration, as in "throwing up one's hands" (for example, after an hour of going around in circles with an argument, you might give up on arguing any further and storm out of the room throwing an "Oy, gevalt" over your shoulder -- sort of a "this situation is hopeless; I give up.").

musici
United States
Local time: 04:57
PRO pts in pair: 4
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19 hrs
Depends on context:


Explanation:
As was already observed, the word comes from Yiddish, not Hebrew. The German word it was derived from spells Gewalt, primarily meaning a) power and b) violence. In Yiddish it is mainly used in the latter sense (outrage, violence, rape), hence, as an exclamation of distress, it is somewhat equivalent to "Murder!" or "Help!", or even "Sauve qui peut!" (French). Depending on the context, it can also be interpreted as a (jocular) intensifier for expressing one's feelings.

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