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ben shalom

English translation: Ben shalom translates literally as The son of peace

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21:42 Jun 26, 2003
Hebrew to English translations [Non-PRO]
Hebrew term or phrase: ben shalom
When someone is leaving, they say "Ben Shalom"
Bernard Miller
English translation:Ben shalom translates literally as The son of peace
Explanation:
I don't know where you picked up the term, but as Leah stated it is NOT a common saying in Hebrew as one is leaving. This could be a local American or British colloquialism born in synagogue gatherings and was derived from Yihiyeh Shalom (the proposed answer by Leah)
Shalom is a common saying, but most people use Lehira'ot which means "see you again."
Selected response from:

ashi
United States
Local time: 12:53
Grading comment
Thanks so much. The context and situation in which "Ben Shalom" was used was quite different and unique. I am still not sure exactly what was implied. I believe the man who spoke this phrase to be either Palestian or of Arab descent. Does this change the meaning?

Thanks again,
Bernard
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Ben shalom translates literally as The son of peace
ashi
4 +1you should have peace
Leah Aharoni
4Bye, shalomDavid Swidler
3In peaceopher


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
you should have peace


Explanation:
I have never heard such an expresion. May be you mean "yehe/yehi shalom", which can be loosely translated as "you should have peace.

Leah Aharoni
Local time: 22:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ashi: May there be peace is a better translation for Yehi shalom
27 mins
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
In peace


Explanation:
Ben shalom would be 'son of peace' but this is not an expression I'm familiar with as a parting. Could be the expression is lech beshalom which translates to 'go in peace.' However, traditionally when parting one would say lech leshalom (literally 'go to peace' but contextually 'go in peace'). Tradition holds that the usage changed from lech beshalom to lech leshalom after King David said to his son Absalom lech beshalom. The next time David saw Absalom (who rebelled against his father) Absalom was dead after having been chased by David's general. This is given as the reason one should avoid saying lech beshalom when parting.

opher
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34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Ben shalom translates literally as The son of peace


Explanation:
I don't know where you picked up the term, but as Leah stated it is NOT a common saying in Hebrew as one is leaving. This could be a local American or British colloquialism born in synagogue gatherings and was derived from Yihiyeh Shalom (the proposed answer by Leah)
Shalom is a common saying, but most people use Lehira'ot which means "see you again."


ashi
United States
Local time: 12:53
PRO pts in pair: 4
Grading comment
Thanks so much. The context and situation in which "Ben Shalom" was used was quite different and unique. I am still not sure exactly what was implied. I believe the man who spoke this phrase to be either Palestian or of Arab descent. Does this change the meaning?

Thanks again,
Bernard

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tal Ganani
19 hrs
  -> thanks Tal
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Bye, shalom


Explanation:
Thinking about what Israelis commonly say, I came up with this. Very often "Bye" is combined with "l'hitraot," so what's to stop someone from attaching it to the slightly more formal ,"shalom" in parting?

Bottom line, no one here has heard "ben shalom" used.

David Swidler
PRO pts in pair: 3
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