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Fakokta (three syllables)

English translation: fakakta = crazy/messed up

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19:49 Dec 21, 2007
Hebrew to English translations [Non-PRO]
Slang / Proper Spelling
Hebrew term or phrase: Fakokta (three syllables)
I am looking for the English spelling of a Hebrew slang term my mother-in-law used to use. I spelled it phonetically but I am sure the proper spelling is nowhere near that. I always understood the term to mean "a mess" or "a bunch of baloney".
xxxRasburyjam
English translation:fakakta = crazy/messed up
Explanation:
it's in Yiddish. See the reference link for examples

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Note added at 4 hrs (2007-12-22 00:05:53 GMT)
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You will find several spellings for this, since Yiddish is written in Hebrew letters: פקקטה
Selected response from:

Sabine Akabayov, PhD
Israel
Local time: 20:18
Grading comment
Very helpful. Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1fakakta = crazy/messed up
Sabine Akabayov, PhD
4Ferkart
Sogifted


  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
fakakta = crazy/messed up


Explanation:
it's in Yiddish. See the reference link for examples

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2007-12-22 00:05:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You will find several spellings for this, since Yiddish is written in Hebrew letters: פקקטה


    Reference: http://www.strumerika.com/2007/03/09/the-yiddish-dictionary/
Sabine Akabayov, PhD
Israel
Local time: 20:18
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
Grading comment
Very helpful. Thank you.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Wow, I guess I wasn't that far off. Thank you so much for the link also. I found it very informative and excellent for a beginner like myself. :-)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vere Barzilai: right, derives also from German - verkakt
1 day6 hrs
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7 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Ferkart


Explanation:
Check out: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Ferkakte. Growing up in a German speaking houshold, there was an R in it, wheever my parents wanted to experess somthing not german (usually) was really worthless...

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Note added at 7 days (2007-12-28 21:38:27 GMT) Post-grading
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Should read FERKAKT, of course....


    Reference: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Ferkakte
Sogifted
United States
Local time: 13:18
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yeah, I think you hit it on the head. Never new my mother-in-law had such a mouth . Thanks for the link also. Will put in my favorites for further references.

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