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tootuk

English translation: This wrod means the "deckof a ship."

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15:45 Nov 21, 2008
Hindi to English translations [PRO]
Ships, Sailing, Maritime
Hindi term or phrase: tootuk
Many thanks.
Marta Silvas
Portugal
Local time: 17:31
English translation:This wrod means the "deckof a ship."
Explanation:
The word Tootak means just "Deck of a ship."
Selected response from:

Narendra Upadhyaya
India
Local time: 22:01
Grading comment
Many thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2This wrod means the "deckof a ship."Narendra Upadhyaya
5The word is not "टूटक" but it is "तूतक".Narendra Upadhyaya
3tootuk
Lalit Sati
3the deck of a ship
Balasubramaniam L.


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
This wrod means the "deckof a ship."


Explanation:
The word Tootak means just "Deck of a ship."

Example sentence(s):
  • "Deck of a ship."
Narendra Upadhyaya
India
Local time: 22:01
Native speaker of: Native in GujaratiGujarati, Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Many thanks.
Notes to answerer
Asker:


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Balasubramaniam L.: I agree with your conclusion. Could you also mention the source for your answer, it will be interesting to know?
14 mins
  -> In fact, while answering I didn't have to refer to a dictionary. Nevertheless, one may refer to any Hindi - English dictionary. However, knowledge of Hindi language is must for using the words in sentence.

neutral  Lalit Sati: क्या यह वाकई हिंदी का शब्द है जो महत्वपूर्ण होते हुए भी शब्दकोषों में स्थान न पा सका? और हिंदी में इसे कैसे लिखेंगे? टूटक या कुछ और?
1 hr
  -> Your doubt is valid. No, it is not a word in Hindi language. This is a word from Gujarati. It is a neuter gender word in Gujarati language, which means frontal angular portion of a ship or a steamer. In fact, Gujarati traders were proven sea-farers.

agree  a1interpreter
2 days12 hrs
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the deck of a ship


Explanation:
I couldn't find this word anywhere in Hindi or English. There is a reference to it in Amitav Ghosh's The Ibis Chresthom athy, where it occurs in the explanation of the glossory term dabusa. The explanation given there is as follows:

dabusa (*Roebuck)Roebuck avers that any cabin may be so designed, but it is a truism that every vessel is world unto itself, with its own tongues and dialects - and on this Ibis this term was applied, applied always and exclusively, to the 'tween-deck', which should properly have been been 'beech-ka-tootuk'.

At another source on the internet, tween deck is defined as follows:

tween-deck tanker. Concept definition:. A sea-going vessel that includes space between two continuous floor-like surfaces ...

In the term beech-ka-tootuk, beech-ka is a Hindi term which means between or middle. Putting these two meanings together, tootuk appears to mean'deck', as the other answerer Narendra too has said.

The Hindi there doesn't seem to be any separate term for deck, and Father Kamil Bulke's English-Hindi dictionary gives 'deck' itself as the Hindi term.



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Note added at 31 मिनट (2008-11-21 16:16:19 GMT)
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Here is the link to Amitava Ghosh's piece where the term tootuk occurs. It appears in the glossary only, so do a Find with this term in the pdf file:

http://www.amitavghosh.com/latest/ibis_chrestomathy.pdf

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Note added at 32 मिनट (2008-11-21 16:17:38 GMT)
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From the explanation given for dabusa, it appears that much of the terminology used in this book is specific to the ship Ibis and is not necessary Hindi or any other language, but coined by the sailors of the ship for use exclusively on the ship.

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Note added at 59 मिनट (2008-11-21 16:44:22 GMT)
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I thought Narendra would be able to provide a source for his answer, but apparently he has just based it on his intuition, which doesn't really help.

In Hindi there is a close-sounding word टोटक (totak) which roughly means spells and witchcraft.

Another close-sounding word is टूट (toot) which means break away. This could be relevant here, for it is suggestive of a deck that is separated from a main deck, thus giving the visual impression of a breakaway deck. It is possible to form the word टूटक (tootak) from the word टूट to suggest this meaning, though it is not common in everyday Hindi.

The word tootak (टूटक or टोटक) does not figure in any of the Hindi or Hindi-English dictionaries that I have. So word as such does not perhaps exist in Hindi.

If the context is 18th century, it could also be a word belonging to some of the dialects of Hindi such as Bhojpuri, Braj, Maithli, etc. In the 18th century a lot of sea-faring activities were going on involving merchants, labourers, soldiers, etc., many of whom spoke various dialects of Hindi.

Balasubramaniam L.
India
Local time: 22:01
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Lalit Sati: आपकी महत्वपूर्ण शोधपरक जानकारी की प्रशंसा करने के बावजूद मुझे नहीं लगता है कि the deck of a ship के लिए यहाँ प्रस्तुत शब्द टूटक या टोटक कोई न्याय कर पाएगा?
1 hr
  -> My overall impression too is similar, if you read the whole answer you will see this. I have concluded that tootuk is not a Hindi word, at least not a modern Hindi word. But its meaning in the context of shipping, does appear to be deck.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The word is not "टूटक" but it is "तूतक".


Explanation:
Your doubt is valid. No, it is not a word in Hindi language. This is a word from Gujarati. It is a neuter gender word in Gujarati language, which means frontal angular portion of a ship or a steamer. In fact, Gujarati traders were proven sea-farers.

The word is not "टूटक" but it is तूतक.

Narendra Upadhyaya
India
Local time: 22:01
Native speaker of: Native in GujaratiGujarati, Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in category: 8
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
tootuk


Explanation:
You may use this word as such.
REF:
1."...Then there is the novel's language, or rather languages. Ghosh's own voice is a recognizably 19th-century one, stately yet brisk, but his characters speak a lively assortment of tongues -- Anglo-Indian ("the flash lingo of the East"), bastardized Franco-English, pidgin, Bhojpuri, and Bengali in addition to a seafaring dialect familiar from any number of maritime adventures. (Among Ghosh's acknowledged sources are An English and Hindostanee Naval Dictionary of Technical Terms and Sea Phrases; he also includes a whimsical "chrestomathy" compiled by Neel, a man "obsessed with the destiny of words")..."

2."...he had to memorize a new shipboard vocabulary, which sounded a bit like English and yet not: the rigging became the ‘ringeen’, ‘avast!’ was ‘bas!’, and the cry of the middle-morning watch went from ‘all’s well’ to ‘alzbel’. The deck now became the ‘tootuk’ ..."

(http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Sea-of-Poppies/Amitav-Ghosh...



Lalit Sati
India
Local time: 22:01
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
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