Sorak, sorak, hoseeeee!

English translation: hip, hip, hooray!

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Indonesian term or phrase:Sorak, sorak, hoseeeee!
English translation:hip, hip, hooray!

11:15 Nov 7, 2011
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2011-11-10 22:54:08 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


Indonesian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / early 1900s Indonesian novel in Malay lingua franca
Indonesian term or phrase: Sorak, sorak, hoseeeee!
A beloved, long-term employee of a C. Java sugar mill is retiring under tragic circumstances and thousands turn out to bid him farewell. After the speeches, there is a toast and everyone shouts "Hip, hip, hooray!" Then they shout "Sorak, sorak, hoseeeee!"

What does that mean?
Catherine Muir
Australia
Local time: 00:15
hip, hip, hooray!
Explanation:
I think hoseee is a mispelling for horee.

It is equal to hip, hip hooray!
I remember there is a song when I was a kid using this expression but I hardly remember.
We usually use this expression in writing a shout of victory.

Sorry, no reference, just my language :)

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Note added at 2 hrs (2011-11-07 14:08:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

the many e(s) does not have a any meaning, it's just that Indonesians always make long speech with long letters, like when we say Hi, not just Hai, but sometimes people write it Haaaaiiiiiiiiiii....

that somehow adds the effect, in this case friendliness effect.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2011-11-07 15:26:12 GMT)
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May be Hoseeee is not a misspelling.
I just remembered watching Jathilan (a kind of traditional dance with many dancers resembling soldiers riding on wicker-bamboo horse, also called Kuda Lumping), they shouted 'Hoseeee' in the dance when the music called for, instead of Horeee.
May be it's a Javanese soldiers shout of showing strength.
Selected response from:

ria ulfah ardhiyani
Australia
Local time: 00:15
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3hip, hip, hooray!
ria ulfah ardhiyani
4Cheers, cheers, hurray !
Budi Suryadi-
4Whoopee doo!
David Andersen
3(No certain meaning)
Ikram Mahyuddin


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
hip, hip, hooray!


Explanation:
I think hoseee is a mispelling for horee.

It is equal to hip, hip hooray!
I remember there is a song when I was a kid using this expression but I hardly remember.
We usually use this expression in writing a shout of victory.

Sorry, no reference, just my language :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2011-11-07 14:08:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

the many e(s) does not have a any meaning, it's just that Indonesians always make long speech with long letters, like when we say Hi, not just Hai, but sometimes people write it Haaaaiiiiiiiiiii....

that somehow adds the effect, in this case friendliness effect.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2011-11-07 15:26:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

May be Hoseeee is not a misspelling.
I just remembered watching Jathilan (a kind of traditional dance with many dancers resembling soldiers riding on wicker-bamboo horse, also called Kuda Lumping), they shouted 'Hoseeee' in the dance when the music called for, instead of Horeee.
May be it's a Javanese soldiers shout of showing strength.

ria ulfah ardhiyani
Australia
Local time: 00:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in IndonesianIndonesian, Native in JavaneseJavanese
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Irma Wildani Anzia
54 mins
  -> terima kasih... :)

agree  Kaharuddin
12 hrs
  -> makasih...

agree  Fery Andriansyah
15 hrs
  -> terima kasih
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Whoopee doo!


Explanation:
I agree that is means hip, hip hooray, but the challenge is to find two synonymous English expressions with a similar meaning, to be a functional equivalent of the source text. I feel "whoopee doo!" fits the bill. Or you could use the alternative whoop-dee-doo!

Example sentence(s):
  • whoopee-doo, you are a great teacher, better than most, thanks.
  • Interjection: whoop-dee-doo ,wûp-dee'doo Exclamation indicating excitement or enthusiasm

    Reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAan0kXbOM8
    Reference: http://www.wordwebonline.com/en/WHOOPDEEDOO
David Andersen
Australia
Local time: 23:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, David. I agree that, for variety, 'Whoop-dee-doo' would be an alternative, but I suspect in the situation they'd just say 'Hip, hip, horray' twice.

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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
(No certain meaning)


Explanation:
Just like "Hip, hip, hooray"

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Note added at 18 jam (2011-11-08 05:18:06 GMT)
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Perhaps that's only a variation.

books.google.co.id/books?isbn=9792235833...Y.B. Mangunwijaya - 2008 - Fiction - 802 halaman

... dan Nyai Setomi menggelegarkan salut penyambutan, sekaligus tanda mengumpulkan rakyat, berbarengan dengan sorak-sorai hosee! Hosee! Dirgahayuuu!

Ikram Mahyuddin
Indonesia
Local time: 20:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in IndonesianIndonesian
PRO pts in category: 17
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2 days 22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Cheers, cheers, hurray !


Explanation:
sorak (verb) means to cheer.
It is repeated here just for emphasis;
the word "cheerleader" for example, has been translated to "pemandu sorak".

Hosee could be a word of Dutch origin, something that the late Y.B.Mangunwijaya would be familiar with.

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Note added at 2 days22 hrs (2011-11-10 09:36:16 GMT)
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Hosee could be derived from the word Hosanna !
Both words mean the same as Hurrah ! or Hurray.

Example sentence(s):
  • Sorak sorak bergembira, bergembira semua (lyrics of a wellknown song)
Budi Suryadi-
Indonesia
Local time: 20:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Indonesian
PRO pts in category: 8
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