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caudle

English translation: caudle

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08:01 Oct 31, 2001
Irish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Irish term or phrase: caudle
Romantic inflection
Isabella
English translation:caudle
Explanation:
Maybe it's the Mayday connection that's romantic?! I found some more interesting information on the internet.

Hope it helps.

Sheila


"On the first of May the herdsmen of every village hold their Beltien (sic), a rural sacrifice. They cut a square trench on the ground, leaving the turf in the middle; on that they make a fire of wood, on which they dress a large caudle of eggs, butter, oatmeal, and milk, and bring, besides the ingredients of the caudle, plenty of beer and whiskey; for each of the company must contribute something.


http://claymore.wisemagic.com/scotradiance/far/far9806.htm



1
St Sigismund of Burgundy (sixth century)
May Day/Beltane: Mayday was a celebration of life and love, of procreation and renewal. It signified mystical union, the time when the plant was in full growth and in harmony with the environment. It was a time of games, song and revelry. The May Queen was chosen in a variety of ways - because she was the most honored, the most beautiful, or sometimes she was selceted by the winner of a joust or tournament.

Celebrants wore green sashes across their bodies or wreaths on their heads. They danced around the maypole counterclockwise, singing. At the end of the song, they gathered dew, which they rubbed into their skin to help their complexions. After this, greenery was collected to make wreaths for the hall. Primroses and convolvulus picked on May first and turned into wreaths were believed to avert evil. Games of all sorts were played and tournaments were held. A feast finished off the night where the foods were all green.

In Scotland at Beltane, shepherds cut a circular trench and lit a fire of sacred wood. They made a caudle of eggs, butter, oatmeal and milk, spilling some on the ground to ensure the safety of their flock in the coming season and to placate the old gods. They drank the caudle with beer and whisky. Often an otacake was baked with nine raised knobs dedicated to various deities and each shepherd broke off a piece and said, "This to thee, preserve thou my sheep." Cattle were made to pass through the smoke of the Beltane baal fire (bonfire) on May first in order to cleanse them. This custom came from the Druids and was eventually Christianized as protection from evil in God's name and to guard against sickness. At one time cattle, especially bulls, were sacrificed at Beltane and it was thought to be especially effective if there was a crescent moon.

http://www.skell.org/may.htm
Selected response from:

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 09:27
Grading comment
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4caudle
Sheila Hardie
2gruel-based alcoholic warm drink (late 18th century)
Jack Doughty


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
gruel-based alcoholic warm drink (late 18th century)


Explanation:
Not sure if this could be described as a "romantic inflection", but here is a definition I found on the Web:
A caudle was also a warm drink, but this time based on gruel, mixed with ale or wine to which spices, sugar or honey were added. As Stephen Maturin's outburst suggests, caudles were commonly given to sick people and especially to women in childbed. The entry in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable suggests that Mr Brewer shared Dr Maturin's detestation, describing the caudle as "any sloppy mess, especially that sweet mixture of gruel and wine or spirits once given by nurses to recently confined women and their 'gossips' who called to see the baby during the first month". Caudles were once common enough that they have given their name to a particular design of container, the caudle cup, from which they were presumably consumed; these were small two-handled cups with a cover, often of silver. The word itself derives from the Latin calidus, 'warm', from which we also get calorie and chowder and which turns up, much disguised, in nonchalent, meaning someone who doesn't get hot under the collar. Another related word is cauldron; this is etymologically a pot for heating people rather than food, since it derives from the Latin calidarium for a hot bath.

Caudles, often thickened with eggs, had been popular drinks from medieval times, commonly as breakfast draughts or as an evening drink in lieu of supper, but by the time of the Napoleonic Wars they had decidedly gone out of fashion except for medicinal purposes. A variant a century before had been the tea caudle, brought back from China about 1664 as a way to eke out that very expensive new drink: "Take two yolks of new-laid eggs, and beat them very well with as much fine sugar as sufficient for the quantity of liquor; when they are very well incorporated, pour your tea upon the eggs and sugar, and stir them well together. So drink it hot". Ale caudles were often made with breadcrumbs as well as eggs. Another use for caudles was as a filling for hot pies, usually with a mixture of wine or verjuice, egg yolks and butter.




    Reference: http://www.quinion.com/words/articles/possets.htm
Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
caudle


Explanation:
Maybe it's the Mayday connection that's romantic?! I found some more interesting information on the internet.

Hope it helps.

Sheila


"On the first of May the herdsmen of every village hold their Beltien (sic), a rural sacrifice. They cut a square trench on the ground, leaving the turf in the middle; on that they make a fire of wood, on which they dress a large caudle of eggs, butter, oatmeal, and milk, and bring, besides the ingredients of the caudle, plenty of beer and whiskey; for each of the company must contribute something.


http://claymore.wisemagic.com/scotradiance/far/far9806.htm



1
St Sigismund of Burgundy (sixth century)
May Day/Beltane: Mayday was a celebration of life and love, of procreation and renewal. It signified mystical union, the time when the plant was in full growth and in harmony with the environment. It was a time of games, song and revelry. The May Queen was chosen in a variety of ways - because she was the most honored, the most beautiful, or sometimes she was selceted by the winner of a joust or tournament.

Celebrants wore green sashes across their bodies or wreaths on their heads. They danced around the maypole counterclockwise, singing. At the end of the song, they gathered dew, which they rubbed into their skin to help their complexions. After this, greenery was collected to make wreaths for the hall. Primroses and convolvulus picked on May first and turned into wreaths were believed to avert evil. Games of all sorts were played and tournaments were held. A feast finished off the night where the foods were all green.

In Scotland at Beltane, shepherds cut a circular trench and lit a fire of sacred wood. They made a caudle of eggs, butter, oatmeal and milk, spilling some on the ground to ensure the safety of their flock in the coming season and to placate the old gods. They drank the caudle with beer and whisky. Often an otacake was baked with nine raised knobs dedicated to various deities and each shepherd broke off a piece and said, "This to thee, preserve thou my sheep." Cattle were made to pass through the smoke of the Beltane baal fire (bonfire) on May first in order to cleanse them. This custom came from the Druids and was eventually Christianized as protection from evil in God's name and to guard against sickness. At one time cattle, especially bulls, were sacrificed at Beltane and it was thought to be especially effective if there was a crescent moon.

http://www.skell.org/may.htm

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 09:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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