ammortamenti

English translation: depreciation and amoritsation

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:ammortamenti
English translation:depreciation and amoritsation
Entered by: Richard Hall

12:23 Apr 15, 2005
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general)
Italian term or phrase: ammortamenti
la struttura dei costi delle due società diverge a testimonianza di una diversità tra le due strutture aziendali (***ammortamenti***, incidenza costo del personale etc).
Colin Ryan (X)
Local time: 06:26
depreciation and amortisation
Explanation:
depreciation is charged on tangible assets (e.g., property, plant and equitpment) while amoritsation is charged on intanbible assets (e.g., copyrights, licences, formation costs). Unless you know what the underlying asset is that is being depreciated/amortised, you should use both terms.
Selected response from:

Richard Hall
United States
Local time: 00:26
Grading comment
Oo, lovely. Thx.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3depreciation and amortisation
Richard Hall
4depreciation
Lietta Warren-Granato
4amortization
Fuseila


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
amortization


Explanation:
.

Fuseila
Local time: 06:26
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
depreciation


Explanation:
ammortamento=depreciation

Lietta Warren-Granato
Italy
Local time: 06:26
Native speaker of: Italian
PRO pts in category: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
depreciation and amortisation


Explanation:
depreciation is charged on tangible assets (e.g., property, plant and equitpment) while amoritsation is charged on intanbible assets (e.g., copyrights, licences, formation costs). Unless you know what the underlying asset is that is being depreciated/amortised, you should use both terms.

Richard Hall
United States
Local time: 00:26
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 17
Grading comment
Oo, lovely. Thx.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jean Martin
27 mins

agree  Jonathan Morris
5 hrs

agree  Marco Borrelli
1 day 26 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search