risottare

English translation: thicken

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:risottare
English translation:thicken
Entered by: Fiona Grace Peterson

16:12 Nov 25, 2019
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / pasta cooking
Italian term or phrase: risottare
A recipe for pasta quills. The cooking time in the recipe is given as the time for cooking the pasta itself, plus three minutes to "risottare la pasta".

Now, I know what they mean by this: basically adding water at the end of the recipe to make the sauce creamier (due to the release of starch from the pasta),as is done when making a risotto:

"La risottatura si effettua direttamente in padella, aggiungendo a poco a poco dell’acqua e continuando a mescolare, finché non sarà assorbita completamente dalla pasta. L’amido rilasciato dalla pasta si legherà al sugo, assicurando una perfetta mantecatura."
https://www.lacucinaitaliana.it/tutorial/i-consigli/risottar...

This term is a little bit problematic, as is "mantecare", which is not always translated (see previous KudoZ question here: https://www.proz.com/kudoz/italian-to-english/food-drink/358...

Just wondering how you would all treat this term?
Many thanks.
Fiona Grace Peterson
Italy
Local time: 19:57
thickening
Explanation:
I'm not a starred chef, but I think this might be it.

Thickening of the sauce.


It feels counter-intuitive to add water to a sauce in order to thicken it, but this trick works! As any Italian home cook will tell you, just a little starchy cooking water gives the sauce extra body and an almost creamy mouthfeel. Have you ever tried this?

All we do is dip out about a half a cup of the cooking water just before draining the pasta. It will look cloudy and yellowish from the starch. Stir this into your simmering sauce a few tablespoons at a time. The sauce will thin out a little and then thicken as the starchy water is absorbed.
https://www.thekitchn.com/quick-tip-thicken-sauces-with-1229...

Selected response from:

texjax DDS PhD
Local time: 13:57
Grading comment
Thank you texjax, and to everyone for your input, I always appreciate it. Buon lavoro a tutti!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4make risotto-style (pasta)
EleoE
3 +3"risottify"
Tom in London
5emulsioning (blending) pasta with its own starch, melted butter and grated cheese
Francesca Bruno
3 +1thickening
texjax DDS PhD
3make the pasta creamy, risotto-style
Kate Chaffer
3Cream
Lisa Jane
2sauté/fry; one-pan-fry; risotto-fry
Wolf Draeger


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
"risottify"


Explanation:
in inverted commas or not as you wish.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2019-11-25 16:31:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course there are no hits on Google. You are asking us to invent a term for "risottare". But hey - good luck.

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52
Notes to answerer
Asker: Zero hits on Google. And I doubt a lot of people would know what you're trying to say with this term.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Definitely in inverted commas, as it's a coinage. You could follow it with "(add water at the end of the recipe to make the sauce creamier)"//Yes, that was discourteous.
25 mins
  -> Thanks Phil but my suggestion was not welcomed by the asker

agree  Jasmina
2 hrs

agree  Lara Barnett: This seems to be the least clumsy way of saying this in the context, while "-ify" as a suffix is a common English form.
1 day 2 hrs
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
thickening


Explanation:
I'm not a starred chef, but I think this might be it.

Thickening of the sauce.


It feels counter-intuitive to add water to a sauce in order to thicken it, but this trick works! As any Italian home cook will tell you, just a little starchy cooking water gives the sauce extra body and an almost creamy mouthfeel. Have you ever tried this?

All we do is dip out about a half a cup of the cooking water just before draining the pasta. It will look cloudy and yellowish from the starch. Stir this into your simmering sauce a few tablespoons at a time. The sauce will thin out a little and then thicken as the starchy water is absorbed.
https://www.thekitchn.com/quick-tip-thicken-sauces-with-1229...



texjax DDS PhD
Local time: 13:57
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Thank you texjax, and to everyone for your input, I always appreciate it. Buon lavoro a tutti!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marc Rizkallah: this is my preferred term as well.
16 hrs
  -> Thank you Marc
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34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Cream


Explanation:
Maybe this could work
3 minutes to cream the pasta

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 35 mins (2019-11-25 16:48:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or the pasta sauce

Lisa Jane
Italy
Local time: 19:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 20
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
make risotto-style (pasta)


Explanation:
Many results on google.
https://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/02/dining/02mini.html
https://www.epicurious.com/expert-advice/how-to-make-creamy-...
https://www.thepauperedchef.com/article/risotto-style-pasta-...
http://lizthechef.com/2012/09/09/recipe-pasta-risotto-gemell...


EleoE
Local time: 11:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in Serbo-CroatSerbo-Croat
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Wolf Draeger: Your 3rd link mentions the "absorption method", another option that seems to be in use; '"pasta risotto" is also out there; and see https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/ditalini-risotto
4 hrs
  -> Thank you. :)

agree  Roberta Broccoletti
6 hrs
  -> Grazie! :)

agree  martini
15 hrs
  -> Grazie mille! :)

agree  Kimberly Ann Franch
5 days
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
make the pasta creamy, risotto-style


Explanation:
https://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/02/dining/02mini.html

Kate Chaffer
Italy
Local time: 19:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
sauté/fry; one-pan-fry; risotto-fry


Explanation:
The problem is in the verb; your text contains a number of verb inflections that are tricky to translate without rewording.

One solution is to use sauté or fry, which is how risotto is cooked (in broth/stock). The drawback is somewhere you have to explain that it's fresh/uncooked pasta rather than boiled pasta that's being sautéed/fried.

Another option is "one-pan pasta" which is a term floating around on the Web, though it isn't quite the same thing as pasta risotto. But here you're losing the verb.

If you're willing to venture into coining territory, perhaps "one-pan-fry" or "risotto-fry"?

Example sentence(s):
  • Fry the (fresh) pasta straight in the pan, adding water little by little and stirring until all of the sauce is absorbed.
  • Sauté the (uncooked) pasta right in the pan, adding water little by little and stirring until the pasta has fully absorbed the sauce.

    Reference: http://www.marthastewart.com/978784/one-pan-pasta
    Reference: http://www.spoonfulofflavor.com/one-pot-creamy-chicken-noodl...
Wolf Draeger
South Africa
Local time: 20:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
emulsioning (blending) pasta with its own starch, melted butter and grated cheese


Explanation:
The word you are looking for is 'emulsioning'

WHAT IS AN EMULSION?
"An emulsion is defined by combining two liquids that will maintain their distinct characteristics after being mixed. When talking about emulsions as applicable in a kitchen, the term emulsion refers to combining fat and water. Culinary emulsion can take two different forms; fat dispersed into water and water dispersed into fat. Common fat in water emulsifications include hollandaise, mayonnaise, aioli, milk, cream, and pan sauces. Water in fat emulsifications are most commonly found in the form of vinaigrettes and whole butter."
https://stellaculinary.com/cooking-videos/food-science-101/f...

as synonym and neologism for 'mantecare'
How To (mantecare)
The saucepan is removed from heat and very cold butter and cheese are added to the preparation, mixing everything with a wooden spoon or, even better, simply moving the saucepan to make the resulting mixture as even and creamy as possible.
https://www.lacucinaitaliana.com/glossary/mantecare

definition of 'risottare'
risottare /ri·sot·tà·re/
verbo transitivo
Cuocere la pasta insieme al suo condimento bagnandola di tanto di tanto con del brodo, secondo la ricetta del risotto.
https://www.google.com/search?q=risottare significato&oq=ris...

Francesca Bruno
Italy
Local time: 19:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 4
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