in corso

English translation: first time enrolment

12:09 Oct 29, 2013
Italian to English translations [Non-PRO]
Education / Pedagogy / university
Italian term or phrase: in corso
Iscrizione : in corso - 1° anno /iscrizione al primo anno in corso. Might "In due time 1st year" work?
roxrox
Italy
English translation:first time enrolment
Explanation:
I was about to agree with Wendy but ......
I actually think the reason for the wording is to emphasise that the student is enrolled in the first year for the "first time" - i.e. to emphasise that the student is not *fuori corso* - a typically Italian concept which simply does not exist in English.

I would suggest something along the lines of Enrolled: 1st time enrolment in the 1st year, then add a Translator's Note to explain that in Italy students can be enrolled each year as first time students or as re-enrolling students who repeat the year as they have not attained the required amount of credits to progress further in their course.

This is my take on this!



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Note added at 6 days (2013-11-04 15:40:50 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thank you! :-)
Selected response from:

Linda Thody
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:44
Grading comment
very helpful, thanks!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +2first time enrolment
Linda Thody
2 +1underway/in progress
Wendy Streitparth


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
underway/in progress


Explanation:
Or am I totally off-track?

Wendy Streitparth
Germany
Local time: 03:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard
18 mins
  -> Thanks, Phil.

agree  crocox
25 mins
  -> Thanks, crocox

agree  LaraBarnett: I would say that "underway" is slightly less formal than "in progress", which I prefer anyway.
31 mins
  -> Thanks Lara. Well, apparently "underway" doesn't exist anyway!

disagree  Angie Garbarino: mmm the Italian sentence is more specific, see Linda answer
59 mins
  -> Yes, asker supplied more information later.

disagree  Tom in London: there is no such word as "underway" - even if the person who wrote the prospectus doesn't know that. The correct term is 2 words: "under way".
1 hr
  -> Following the publication of the college prospectus, enrolment is underway for term one http://www.nelft.nhs.uk/_documentbank/130924_TB_Part_I_paper...
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
first time enrolment


Explanation:
I was about to agree with Wendy but ......
I actually think the reason for the wording is to emphasise that the student is enrolled in the first year for the "first time" - i.e. to emphasise that the student is not *fuori corso* - a typically Italian concept which simply does not exist in English.

I would suggest something along the lines of Enrolled: 1st time enrolment in the 1st year, then add a Translator's Note to explain that in Italy students can be enrolled each year as first time students or as re-enrolling students who repeat the year as they have not attained the required amount of credits to progress further in their course.

This is my take on this!



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 days (2013-11-04 15:40:50 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thank you! :-)

Linda Thody
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
very helpful, thanks!!!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Linda, thank you for your 'take'. Actually you got the point!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Angie Garbarino: I agree with you, and I have to say that by correctly undertanding the Italian sentence this is not a NON-Pro question :)
20 mins
  -> Thanks for confirming my understanding Angie!! :-)

agree  JudyC: but without translator's note, as you'd have to explain "in corso, ripetente and fuori corso" http://tinyurl.com/ms5r7xb
17 hrs
  -> Thanks Judy! I agree it would have to be a rather lengthy Translator's Note to explain the entire concept!
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