dégagé

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:dégagé
English translation:post-active
Entered by: Lorraine Buckley (X)

13:23 Jan 21, 2010
This question was closed without grading. Reason: Answer found elsewhere

Italian to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Human Resources / Pensionati/dégagés
Italian term or phrase: dégagé
I have a breakdown of staff in an organization by department (prof, admin, temporary etc) and then 'pensionati/dégagés' (no further context available, unfortunately). In an HR context, is this likely to mean people fired? freelancers? other? I have never come across the term before. Many thanks
Lorraine Buckley (X)
Italy
Local time: 04:27


Summary of answers provided
4“externals“ (but see..)
Michael Korovkin
3libro (da impegni)
Giuseppe Bellone
3unemployed - disengaged
tluna


  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
unemployed - disengaged


Explanation:
I think for the context it out mean retired (pensionati) or out of job/unemployed workforce....
I might be wrong, though

tluna
Italy
Local time: 04:27
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
libro (da impegni)


Explanation:
Cioè che possono prestare la loro opera non avendo altro da fare. Mia pura supposizione. Ma questo è francese , in italinao NON esiste affatto!

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Note added at 24 min (2010-01-21 13:47:29 GMT)
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Scusa "libero" intendevo. Quindi "unimployed" "unoccupied" credo, come già suggerito. Scusa il pasticcio causato dal tuo scambio di lingue. Intendevi francese-inglse, immagino.:)

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Note added at 25 min (2010-01-21 13:48:50 GMT)
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"unemployed", scusa , oggi sono fuso....

Giuseppe Bellone
Italy
Local time: 04:27
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks for your input. Yeah, I do speak French but I did mean Italian-English because I am translating an Italian text and the Italian writer used this term (though I suspect it to be UE-speak!). Think of the difference between asking for help on 'sono andato al night' on the Italian forum and asking for 'I went to the night' on the English one. Or the difference between the meaning of 'bimbo' in Italian and in English.....

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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
“externals“ (but see..)


Explanation:
I'd definitely leave it as "dégagé": you aren't supposed to translate French and Latin clichès ... appunto – clichès! :)

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Note added at 7 hrs (2010-01-21 21:13:59 GMT)
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The dudes ho are no longer or have never been on the payroll – not even as contrattisti, etc. Like, say, a guy who every now and then finds you a client/a deal and gets his finder's fee for that. Or the guys who are no longer with the company but do occasionally help out and/or consult

Michael Korovkin
Italy
Local time: 04:27
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 11
Notes to answerer
Asker: It could be an idea to leave it - but please, what is it likely to MEAN in this context? How can we call it a cliché if the meaning is not clear?

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