civetta

English translation: teaser

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:civetta
English translation:teaser
Entered by: ines atrep

08:18 Jun 7, 2010
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Journalism
Italian term or phrase: civetta
Si tratta di un pezzo di articolo o di una semplice segnalazione in prima pagina di un articolo posizionato nelle pagine interne del giornale.
ines atrep
Local time: 07:12
teaser
Explanation:
At the beginning of a newscast or on the front page, when an upcoming story is referenced near the start or on the frontpage - in journalism jargon, we call this a 'teaser'. It is not the whole story, just the headline, with a brief description of the story. [This might be similar to the translation of 'civetta' as a 'flirt' (being similar to 'a tease'). Other more formal terms for newspaper layout are 'subhead,' 'dek/deck,' - and if 'teaser' is too risqué, a synonym used is 'blurb.' But 'deck' is really a subtitle-like headline under the main headline. So, I would stick with 'teaser'. 'civetta' is not exactly a 'promo' - but it could be translated this way. [In TV journalism jargon it's specifically also known as a 'cold open.]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 hrs (2010-06-07 22:30:16 GMT)
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To emphasize better why I select 'teaser' (a common journalism jargon) as a translation for 'civetta' comes from a translation for 'civetta' as a 'tease' or 'teaser' in some dictionaries[http://www.wordreference.com/enit/tease]. It seems someone has taken this common English jargon and translated it to Italian - and now it's a question of reverse translation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day11 hrs (2010-06-08 19:58:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Further explanation might be needed for my answer: I found this blog entry similar to my point - "A newspaper billboard is called in italian "civetta", which is literally little owl, but also means coquette, flirt or tease. So these devices are commonly referred to as "civette" because their purpose is to entice the passer-by into buying the actual paper." [source http://triestedailyphoto.blogspot.com/2009/02/carnival-owl.h...] As well, a nice practical example of how teaser is used in journalism-speak: "Users should be able to glance at the teasers and get an idea of what is going on inside. Text-only teasers cannot convey information as quickly as combinations of text and graphics can. Teasers also can help create an information hierarchy, so readers will instantly know the highlights of the paper." [source http://www.brasstacksdesign.com/benton_mission.htm] This figurative translation from La Biblioteca di Republica Dizionario di Italiano-Inglese for civetta as a coquette, flirt; is similar to the nouns tease or teaser. And here's another dictionary online definition of teaser as journalism jargon "a short line of copy set in a distinctive type above a headline and intended to call attention to it." [source http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/teaser] And similarly "Teaser - used in print publications. Typically a graphical element hyping a story somewhere else in the publication." [source http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/215516/the_jargon_o...]. Given that 'civetta' has been translated as 'tease' in some dictionaries as 'civetta' and vice versa, and 'teaser' is a frequently used jargon of journalists - including my professors where I took my degree in journalism - this was how I concluded to translate the one word in question as another single word, teaser. There are lots of newspaper layout words for the various boxes and sections of a newspaper's 'prima pagina' - but I was unable to see their etymological connection to the Italian word 'civetta.'
Selected response from:

Mr Murray (X)
Italy
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1Cover lines (a.k.a. coverlines, cutlines)
Rosanna Palermo
4teaser
Mr Murray (X)
4Front-page headline box
Gad Kohenov
3front-page headline box
Giuseppe Bellone


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
front-page headline box


Explanation:
Così il mio dizionario

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 min (2010-06-07 08:20:39 GMT)
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Ma aspetta conferme. :)

Giuseppe Bellone
Italy
Local time: 07:12
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Front-page headline box


Explanation:
4 (giorn) front-page headline box

Taken from the Hopeli dictionary.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2010-06-07 08:25:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(Giorn) headline display sheet = another possibility found in the Sansoni dictionary.

Gad Kohenov
Israel
Local time: 08:12
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Cover lines (a.k.a. coverlines, cutlines)


Explanation:
Here's a useful link to publishing terms.

[DOC] Magazine Publishing TerminologyFile Format: Microsoft Word - View as HTML
Magazine Publishing Terminology. Masthead – The masthead is the lineup of editors that is usually published in a narrow column near the front of the ...
static.hcrhs.k12.nj.us/gems/.../MagazineTerminology.doc - Similar

Cover lines – one-line descriptions of articles found on the cover of the magazine. Their purpose is to entice the reader into picking up the magazine.

and another, bigger glossary
http://www.woodenhorsepub.com/glossary.htm

COVERLINES
Short lines of copy placed on the cover of a publication to entice newsstand browsers to buy it. Also called cutlines.
CUTLINES
Short lines of copy placed on the cover of a publication to entice newsstand browsers to buy it. Also called coverlines.

Rosanna Palermo
Local time: 01:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 15

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  potra: Yes
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
teaser


Explanation:
At the beginning of a newscast or on the front page, when an upcoming story is referenced near the start or on the frontpage - in journalism jargon, we call this a 'teaser'. It is not the whole story, just the headline, with a brief description of the story. [This might be similar to the translation of 'civetta' as a 'flirt' (being similar to 'a tease'). Other more formal terms for newspaper layout are 'subhead,' 'dek/deck,' - and if 'teaser' is too risqué, a synonym used is 'blurb.' But 'deck' is really a subtitle-like headline under the main headline. So, I would stick with 'teaser'. 'civetta' is not exactly a 'promo' - but it could be translated this way. [In TV journalism jargon it's specifically also known as a 'cold open.]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 hrs (2010-06-07 22:30:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To emphasize better why I select 'teaser' (a common journalism jargon) as a translation for 'civetta' comes from a translation for 'civetta' as a 'tease' or 'teaser' in some dictionaries[http://www.wordreference.com/enit/tease]. It seems someone has taken this common English jargon and translated it to Italian - and now it's a question of reverse translation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day11 hrs (2010-06-08 19:58:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Further explanation might be needed for my answer: I found this blog entry similar to my point - "A newspaper billboard is called in italian "civetta", which is literally little owl, but also means coquette, flirt or tease. So these devices are commonly referred to as "civette" because their purpose is to entice the passer-by into buying the actual paper." [source http://triestedailyphoto.blogspot.com/2009/02/carnival-owl.h...] As well, a nice practical example of how teaser is used in journalism-speak: "Users should be able to glance at the teasers and get an idea of what is going on inside. Text-only teasers cannot convey information as quickly as combinations of text and graphics can. Teasers also can help create an information hierarchy, so readers will instantly know the highlights of the paper." [source http://www.brasstacksdesign.com/benton_mission.htm] This figurative translation from La Biblioteca di Republica Dizionario di Italiano-Inglese for civetta as a coquette, flirt; is similar to the nouns tease or teaser. And here's another dictionary online definition of teaser as journalism jargon "a short line of copy set in a distinctive type above a headline and intended to call attention to it." [source http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/teaser] And similarly "Teaser - used in print publications. Typically a graphical element hyping a story somewhere else in the publication." [source http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/215516/the_jargon_o...]. Given that 'civetta' has been translated as 'tease' in some dictionaries as 'civetta' and vice versa, and 'teaser' is a frequently used jargon of journalists - including my professors where I took my degree in journalism - this was how I concluded to translate the one word in question as another single word, teaser. There are lots of newspaper layout words for the various boxes and sections of a newspaper's 'prima pagina' - but I was unable to see their etymological connection to the Italian word 'civetta.'

Example sentence(s):
  • Shows what is in the inside of the paper or previews a story or series. Same as a promo but smaller.

    Reference: http://www.freep.com/legacy/jobspage/high/jargon.htm
Mr Murray (X)
Italy
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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