sottoporre ad ipoteca i beni ereditari

English translation: (submit) consent(ing) to the mortgaging (hypothecation) of the estate assets

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:sottoporre ad ipoteca i beni ereditari
English translation:(submit) consent(ing) to the mortgaging (hypothecation) of the estate assets
Entered by: Maria Falvo

07:20 May 20, 2019
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s) / Procura notarile
Italian term or phrase: sottoporre ad ipoteca i beni ereditari
Il nominato procuratore potrà...

"chiedere dilazioni di imposte, sottoponendo ad ipoteca i beni ereditari a favore dell'amministrazione finanziaria, ovvero prestando altre idonee garanzie, etc..."

Grazie!

ps: through mortgage on estate assets is my attempt but it's a bit shaky.
Maria Falvo
Italy
Local time: 07:48
(submit) consent(ing) to the mortgaging (hypothecation) of the estate assets
Explanation:
This is a 'streamlined' answer.

Mortgage IMO is the generic term for US/Can/E&W/Oz etc. (vs. Scots standard security) and, covering a multitude of scenarios, can be taken by a mortgagee/ mortgage lender over goods (chattels = conditional bills of sale by way of mortgage), ship, company shares (a mortgage in fact being a standard UK company law textbook term vs. a pledge or charge, both of the latter though used in actual legal practice), land and buildings.

The difference between a mortgage, lien and charge....(non-Transatlantically) gulp! - see chapter 4. Property, vol. 1 of Oxford English Private Law) that, alas, is neither definitive, nor categoric, on this subject of 'security interests'.

Charging and liening of property, as in Alison's answer, are in fact 'acceptable' verbs.

Land lien (US) = a land charge in England & Wales where a lien can be taken over company shares by the company itself for non-payment of calls on shares. This can be enforced by a charging order - coincidentally, a kind of court-ordered mortgage.

In the US also, a mechanic's lien can be taken over *land* for non-payment of a bill whereas, in the UK, a tradesmen's lien can taken over the work unpaid and a hotelier's lien over a non-paying guest's luggage.

UK companies will have fixed charges taken by lenders over land, plant, machinery & equipment and floating charges under a registered *debenture* over the company assets 'changing from time to time in the course of business'.

We will leave for now pledges and pawns, the latter as in Rod Steiger's legendary film: 'The Pawnbroker').

As a footnote by way of a rough analogy, if you know German and even if you don't, 'sich ... ( dative) unterwerfen' (to submit or subject o.s. to) corresponds to sottoporre, namely in the following case of *assenting or consenting* to a mortgage of land.
Selected response from:

Adrian MM.
United Kingdom
Grading comment
I wouldn't do any better. Thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1charge or lien
Alison Kennedy
3(submit) consent(ing) to the mortgaging (hypothecation) of the estate assets
Adrian MM.


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
charge or lien


Explanation:
The rest is correct. Ipoteca is often translated as charge.

Alison Kennedy
Italy
Local time: 07:48
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 271
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Alison.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Stuart and Aida Nelson: basically right but what would you say: charging / liening the estate assets?//LOL I like the grammar math :)
46 mins
  -> I think the colleague can do the grammar math :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days 11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
(submit) consent(ing) to the mortgaging (hypothecation) of the estate assets


Explanation:
This is a 'streamlined' answer.

Mortgage IMO is the generic term for US/Can/E&W/Oz etc. (vs. Scots standard security) and, covering a multitude of scenarios, can be taken by a mortgagee/ mortgage lender over goods (chattels = conditional bills of sale by way of mortgage), ship, company shares (a mortgage in fact being a standard UK company law textbook term vs. a pledge or charge, both of the latter though used in actual legal practice), land and buildings.

The difference between a mortgage, lien and charge....(non-Transatlantically) gulp! - see chapter 4. Property, vol. 1 of Oxford English Private Law) that, alas, is neither definitive, nor categoric, on this subject of 'security interests'.

Charging and liening of property, as in Alison's answer, are in fact 'acceptable' verbs.

Land lien (US) = a land charge in England & Wales where a lien can be taken over company shares by the company itself for non-payment of calls on shares. This can be enforced by a charging order - coincidentally, a kind of court-ordered mortgage.

In the US also, a mechanic's lien can be taken over *land* for non-payment of a bill whereas, in the UK, a tradesmen's lien can taken over the work unpaid and a hotelier's lien over a non-paying guest's luggage.

UK companies will have fixed charges taken by lenders over land, plant, machinery & equipment and floating charges under a registered *debenture* over the company assets 'changing from time to time in the course of business'.

We will leave for now pledges and pawns, the latter as in Rod Steiger's legendary film: 'The Pawnbroker').

As a footnote by way of a rough analogy, if you know German and even if you don't, 'sich ... ( dative) unterwerfen' (to submit or subject o.s. to) corresponds to sottoporre, namely in the following case of *assenting or consenting* to a mortgage of land.

Example sentence(s):
  • Consent to Mortgage form by Occupier This is a mortgage form used when a purchaser is purchasing property ( with a mortgage ) where, on completion, there will be a non-owning occupier, over the age of 18 also living at the property.

    Reference: http://eng.proz.com/kudoz/german-to-english/bus-financial/42...
    Reference: http://www.fridaysmove.com/property-law-glossary/consent-mor...
Adrian MM.
United Kingdom
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 48
Grading comment
I wouldn't do any better. Thanks.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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