caduta di un verso

English translation: dropped line

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:caduta di un verso
English translation:dropped line
Entered by: Annalisa Distasi

10:36 Mar 16, 2016
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / Ancient Greek Phylology
Italian term or phrase: caduta di un verso
Here is the context:
Non sembra dunque necessario sospettare che il v. 69 sia stato interpolato, o la caduta di un verso tra i vv. 68s.:

I am not sure whether using 'a verse was lost' is specific or accurate enough for this. Thanks for any help you might be able to give me!
Annalisa Distasi
Italy
Local time: 05:45
dropped line
Explanation:
There is a slight difference between line'' and 'verse' (Sing &Pl)

In your case is a "line"

See 1° Link
In poetry, a dropped line is a line which is broken into two lines, but where the second part is indented to remain sequential visually. For example, in the poem "The Other Side of the River" by Charles Wright, the first and second lines form a dropped line, as do the fourth and fifth lines:[1]

It's linkage I'm talking about,

and harmonies and structures,

And all the various things that lock our wrists to the past.

Something infinite behind everything appears,

and then disappears.
— Charles Wright, The Other Side of the River

It would be nice to know the name of the author is referring to.


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Note added at 51 mins (2016-03-16 11:28:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A nice link for you
DIZIONARIO DELLA TERMINOLOGIA FILOLOGICA
https://books.google.it/books?id=tydUAwAAQBAJ&pg=PT243&lpg=P...

See also PAGE 198 - INTERPOLARE
Selected response from:

Francesca Bruno
Italy
Local time: 05:45
Grading comment
Grazie mille!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3dropped line
Francesca Bruno


  

Answers


47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
dropped line


Explanation:
There is a slight difference between line'' and 'verse' (Sing &Pl)

In your case is a "line"

See 1° Link
In poetry, a dropped line is a line which is broken into two lines, but where the second part is indented to remain sequential visually. For example, in the poem "The Other Side of the River" by Charles Wright, the first and second lines form a dropped line, as do the fourth and fifth lines:[1]

It's linkage I'm talking about,

and harmonies and structures,

And all the various things that lock our wrists to the past.

Something infinite behind everything appears,

and then disappears.
— Charles Wright, The Other Side of the River

It would be nice to know the name of the author is referring to.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 51 mins (2016-03-16 11:28:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A nice link for you
DIZIONARIO DELLA TERMINOLOGIA FILOLOGICA
https://books.google.it/books?id=tydUAwAAQBAJ&pg=PT243&lpg=P...

See also PAGE 198 - INTERPOLARE


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dropped_line
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verse_(poetry)
Francesca Bruno
Italy
Local time: 05:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Grazie mille!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  philgoddard: How do you know it's a line?
5 hrs
  -> Because even if a verse is indeed a single metrical line, this term is also used for stanza. Therefore, I would avoid meaning ambiguity. In addition, the collocation 'dropped+line' is widely used.
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