espressione carbonica

English translation: effervescent mouthfeel

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:espressione carbonica
English translation:effervescent mouthfeel
Entered by: Sarah Gregg

06:55 Aug 1, 2019
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Wine / Oenology / Viticulture
Italian term or phrase: espressione carbonica
I'm translating some text for the website of a winery that includes a brief description of the strong points of the wines. The text emphasises the fact that the wine is untreated, thus guaranteeing "un naturale indice di rotondità e un'espressione carbonica avvolgente e cremosa". I'm not sure what that "espressione carbonica" means and how best to translate it. Can anyone help me out? Thanks in advance.
Sarah Gregg
Italy
Local time: 09:01
effervescent mouthfeel
Explanation:
Carbonica refers to effervescence, so in light of the adjectives that follow, I would use mouthfeel for the "expression" of said bubbles.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2019-08-01 09:21:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Barbara has given a fantastic reference below (and as a newb who's currently collecting resources, I greatly appreciate it, Barbara - thank you!), and lead me to a bit more searching.

This might be of interest, seeing the use of cremosa

https://www.scmp.com/magazines/post-magazine/food-drink/arti...
Selected response from:

Kimberly Ann Franch
Italy
Local time: 09:01
Grading comment
Love it. Thanks to you all.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1effervescent mouthfeel
Kimberly Ann Franch
Summary of reference entries provided
Could 'prickle' help?
Barbara Carrara

  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
effervescent mouthfeel


Explanation:
Carbonica refers to effervescence, so in light of the adjectives that follow, I would use mouthfeel for the "expression" of said bubbles.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2019-08-01 09:21:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Barbara has given a fantastic reference below (and as a newb who's currently collecting resources, I greatly appreciate it, Barbara - thank you!), and lead me to a bit more searching.

This might be of interest, seeing the use of cremosa

https://www.scmp.com/magazines/post-magazine/food-drink/arti...


    https://www.winefrog.com/definition/486/mouthfeel
Kimberly Ann Franch
Italy
Local time: 09:01
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Love it. Thanks to you all.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Good idea.
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, Phil.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


2 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: Could 'prickle' help?

Reference information:
Here's what I hope can be a clue, just to get the ball rolling. HTH

'Prickle: a prickly sensation caused by the presence of carbon dioxide which accentuates the acidity of white wines and the astringency of reds, while reducing the impact of sweetness.'
( https://tinyurl.com/y5we6hpm )

The term comes up in a search for 'carbonica' on Giles Watson's Wine Glossary
If you still haven't registered on it, I would strongly suggest that you do, as it's an authoritative, wonderful reference tool for wine experts and enthusiasts alike, created by the late, and very much missed on these pages and elsewhere, Giles Watson.

Barbara Carrara
Italy
Native speaker of: Italian
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  philgoddard: Though it depends on the wine as to whether this is a desirable characteristic, and I'm not sure it sounds very appetising: http://en.mimi.hu/wine/prickly.html
3 hrs
  -> Absolutely. Thanks, Phil.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search