KudoZ home » Italian to English » Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting

arte povera

English translation: arte povera

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
06:53 Apr 3, 2002
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting
Italian term or phrase: arte povera
Questa frase l`ho riscontrata in un text di una ditta producente le porte. Cosa potrebbe significare? "Stile semplice" ho qualche cosa altro?
estivo
Russian Federation
Local time: 12:13
English translation:arte povera
Explanation:
Don't translate this term. There's an explanation in the link below:

Arte Povera [It.: ‘impoverished art’].
Term coined by the Genoese critic Germano Celant in 1967 for a group of Italian artists who, from the late 1960s, attempted to break down the ‘dichotomy between art and life’ (Celant: Flash Art, 1967), mainly through the creation of happenings and sculptures made from everyday materials. Such an attitude was opposed to the conventional role of art merely to reflect reality. The first Arte Povera exhibition was held at the Galleria La Bertesca, Genoa, in 1967. Subsequent shows included those at the Galleria De’Foscherari in Bologna and the Arsenale in Amalfi (both 1968), the latter containing examples of performance art by such figures as MICHELANGELO PISTOLETTO. In general the work is characterized by startling juxtapositions of apparently unconnected objects: for example, in Venus of the Rags (1967; Naples, Di Bennardo col., see 1989 exh. cat., p. 365), Pistoletto created a vivid contrast between the cast of an antique sculpture (used as if it were a ready-made) and a brightly coloured pile of rags. Such combination of Classical and contemporary imagery had been characteristic of Giorgio de Chirico’s work from c. 1912 onwards. Furthermore, Arte Povera’s choice of unglamorous materials had been anticipated by more recent work, such as that of Emilio Vedova and Alberto Burri in the 1950s and 1960s, while Piero Manzoni had subverted traditional notions of the artist’s functions (e.g. Artist’s Shit, 1961, see 1989 exh. cat., p. 298). Like Manzoni’s innovations, Arte Povera was also linked to contemporary political radicalism, which culminated in the student protests of 1968. This is evident in such works as the ironic Golden Italy (1971; artist’s col., see 1993 exh. cat., p. 63) by LUCIANO FABRO, a gilded bronze relief of the map of Italy, hung upside down in a gesture that was literally revolutionary.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 07:00:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.artnet.com/library/00/0043/T004357.ASP

http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/exhibitions/artepovera/default...
Selected response from:

Fernando Muela
Spain
Local time: 08:13
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your answer I very grateful to you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +7arte povera
Fernando Muela
4everyday design.gianni73
5 -1poor art, lack of art, weak art, plain art, bare artTBQGS


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
poor art, lack of art, weak art, plain art, bare art


Explanation:
HTH
Good luck!

TBQGS

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  npage: Arte povera in the furniture and interior design context actually refers to a kind of chunky country style suggesting the good old times and/or a trendy, ecologically-based approach to life which has little to do with the 60's art movement.
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
arte povera


Explanation:
Don't translate this term. There's an explanation in the link below:

Arte Povera [It.: ‘impoverished art’].
Term coined by the Genoese critic Germano Celant in 1967 for a group of Italian artists who, from the late 1960s, attempted to break down the ‘dichotomy between art and life’ (Celant: Flash Art, 1967), mainly through the creation of happenings and sculptures made from everyday materials. Such an attitude was opposed to the conventional role of art merely to reflect reality. The first Arte Povera exhibition was held at the Galleria La Bertesca, Genoa, in 1967. Subsequent shows included those at the Galleria De’Foscherari in Bologna and the Arsenale in Amalfi (both 1968), the latter containing examples of performance art by such figures as MICHELANGELO PISTOLETTO. In general the work is characterized by startling juxtapositions of apparently unconnected objects: for example, in Venus of the Rags (1967; Naples, Di Bennardo col., see 1989 exh. cat., p. 365), Pistoletto created a vivid contrast between the cast of an antique sculpture (used as if it were a ready-made) and a brightly coloured pile of rags. Such combination of Classical and contemporary imagery had been characteristic of Giorgio de Chirico’s work from c. 1912 onwards. Furthermore, Arte Povera’s choice of unglamorous materials had been anticipated by more recent work, such as that of Emilio Vedova and Alberto Burri in the 1950s and 1960s, while Piero Manzoni had subverted traditional notions of the artist’s functions (e.g. Artist’s Shit, 1961, see 1989 exh. cat., p. 298). Like Manzoni’s innovations, Arte Povera was also linked to contemporary political radicalism, which culminated in the student protests of 1968. This is evident in such works as the ironic Golden Italy (1971; artist’s col., see 1993 exh. cat., p. 63) by LUCIANO FABRO, a gilded bronze relief of the map of Italy, hung upside down in a gesture that was literally revolutionary.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 07:00:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.artnet.com/library/00/0043/T004357.ASP

http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/exhibitions/artepovera/default...

Fernando Muela
Spain
Local time: 08:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your answer I very grateful to you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Grace Anderson: Grace Anderson
4 mins

agree  xxxTanuki
7 mins

agree  Kenji Otomo
18 mins

agree  Federica Jean: in this case, it probably means "in the style of arte povera furniture", i.e. thick, dark wood & simple, rustic design
21 mins

agree  Enza Longo
2 hrs

agree  luskie
10 hrs

agree  Vanita
1 day44 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
everyday design.


Explanation:
it concerns about something taken from everyday situations

gianni73
Italy
Local time: 08:13
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Aug 24, 2005 - Changes made by Fernando Muela:
Field (specific)(none) » Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search