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terun

English translation: terun = meridionale = man from the south of Italy

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02:09 Nov 26, 2001
Italian to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Italian term or phrase: terun
A short story. It is Milanese dialect, and the line reads:"...mi fa un po' specie quando sento qualche terun come mio padre che borbotta cose tipo:..."
I think that perhaps 'geezer' might fit, but I am by no means certain. Is there a more perjorative meaning to this word?
Gabriel Ross
English translation:terun = meridionale = man from the south of Italy
Explanation:
it is a not-so-positive expression to indicate a man from the south of Italy.
You can translate it into Italian as "meridionale" (less negative) or "terrone".
No idea about the English equivalent.
ciao
Barbara
Selected response from:

Barbara Cattaneo
Local time: 17:02
Grading comment
Grazie mille...finding an English rendering will be a challenge!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1terun = meridionale = man from the south of Italy
Barbara Cattaneo
4 +1southern sodNicholas Hunt
5terrone
dieter haake
4 +1southern peasant/peasant from the South
CLS Lexi-tech
4peasantMaria De Rose
4appellative for emigrants from Southern to Northen Italy in the 60's
anusca
4southern redneck
Angela Arnone
4Southern /people from the south of Italy
Bruno Capitelli
4terrone
Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
terun = meridionale = man from the south of Italy


Explanation:
it is a not-so-positive expression to indicate a man from the south of Italy.
You can translate it into Italian as "meridionale" (less negative) or "terrone".
No idea about the English equivalent.
ciao
Barbara

Barbara Cattaneo
Local time: 17:02
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 105
Grading comment
Grazie mille...finding an English rendering will be a challenge!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alison kennedy: If you literary context allows you to to so, I would leave the word in the original Milanese dialect which has probably been used for a specific reason in the text and supply a approx translation in ().
31 mins
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Southern /people from the south of Italy


Explanation:
It's milanese dialect with a soft dispregiative sound

Bruno
(milanese)

Bruno Capitelli
Local time: 17:02
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 59

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL: being a terrone myself, I wouldn't call it "soft". But obviously, it depends on the context...
2 mins
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
terrone


Explanation:
person from Southern Italy... it's a derogatory term used by Northern Italians to describe Southern Italians. Can't translate it. Leave it as it is (maybe with an explanation in brackets).

Giovanni (un terrone)

Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:02
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 626
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
terrone


Explanation:
not geezer but:
terun=terrone
sopranome dato dagli italiani settentrionali a quelli meridionali

buon lavoro

didi


    dizionario
dieter haake
Austria
Local time: 17:02
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 4
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
southern redneck


Explanation:
is about the closest I can come up with.

"Terrone" - someone who is linked with the soil, therefore a rustic simpleton.
As the others state before me, used offensively by the superior Northerners (polentoni - eaters of polenta) to cut the southern classes down to size.

Up to you whether you translate it or not, depending on the context of your tale.
Cheers
Angela - whose neck is red and definitely southern

Angela Arnone
Local time: 17:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3602

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Louise Norman: It depends who your audience is. This sounds distinctively American and is not something I would use in British English
3 hrs
  -> ah but, Gabriel doesn't specify what English he wants! I could say the same for "sod" - very UK English
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
southern sod


Explanation:
Probably untranslatable but this perhaps gives the idea of a by no means friendly term though when used by a son to discribe his father there is perhaps an element of warmth in its use which "sod" might seem to convey, as well as the joint etymological root relating to the soil.
Hope this helps.
Bye for now,
Nicholas

Nicholas Hunt
Italy
Local time: 17:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 171

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Angela Arnone: "sod"? Not happy about that - it's abb. for sodomite and I'm not sure that's the intention here although your play on words is excellent Nick!
3 mins

neutral  Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL: yes, Angela, but nobody now relates the word "sod" to sodomite! It's so widely used, it has lost its original connotation.
33 mins

agree  Louise Norman: Yes, sorry to all you southerners but some of my friends from the North of England would use the expression 'Southern sod' in a friendly, sarcastic way
3 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
appellative for emigrants from Southern to Northen Italy in the 60's


Explanation:
I would not translate it. I would put it between inverted commas adding an explanation or a foot note

Of course you will find a way to say it better in English

rgrds
anusca

anusca
Italy
Local time: 17:02
Native speaker of: Italian
PRO pts in pair: 164
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
southern peasant/peasant from the South


Explanation:
the meaning of the term has been explained by my colleagues and won't repeat myself here. I would not leave it in English, since it is a literary translation and having a word in Italian that has a pretty good English transation would make the sentence uselessly cumbersom, UNLESS there are many such words and it is part of your general translation strategy.
The term "terun" also implies "paesant" somebody who works with the earth;
See Webster for more inspiration:
Peasant \Peas"ant\, n. [OF. pa["i]sant (the i being perh. due to confusion with the p. pr. of verbs), pa["i]san, F. paysan, fr. OF. & F. pays country, fr. L. pagus the country. See {Pagan}.] A countryman; a rustic; especially, one of the lowest class of tillers of the soil in European countries.
Syn: Countryman; rustic; swain; hind.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) (web1913)
Peasant \Peas"ant\, a. Rustic, rural. --Spenser.
From WordNet (r) 1.6 (wn)
peasant n 1: a country person [syn: {provincial}, {bucolic}] 2: one of a (chiefly European) class of agricultural laborers 3: a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinement [syn: {barbarian}, {boor}, {churl}, {Goth}, {tyke}, {tike}]

buon lavoro
ciao

paola l m


CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 11:02
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 1505

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Louise Norman: I think that sums it up perfectly.
7 mins
  -> thanks Louise and have a good day
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
peasant


Explanation:
My explanation to this express is that of a peasant, a person whom is ignorant and with no manners and belongs to the south, as if ti imply that the person is inferior. It is definately an insult.

Maria De Rose
Local time: 17:02
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