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virtù

English translation: strength, skill, prowess

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08:48 Dec 3, 2001
Italian to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Italian term or phrase: virtù
in Machiavelli's The Prince
English translation:strength, skill, prowess
Explanation:
There are a number of translations... up to you to choose one ;-)


In 1513 Machiavelli wrote his best-known work, Il Principe (The Prince). Dedicated to Lorenzo de' Medici, this little book offers practical advice on how to rule a city like sixteenth-century Florence. Its over-all theme is that the successful prince must exhibit virtù [variously translated as "strength," "skill," or "prowess"] in both favorable and adverse circumstances. This crucial quality of leadership is not the same as the virtuous character described by ethical philosophers, since Machiavelli held that public success and private morality are entirely separate. The question is not what makes a good human being, but what makes a good prince.
Selected response from:

Hans Hereijgers
Local time: 09:26
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2strength, skill, prowess
Hans Hereijgers
5virtùZaltys
4Virtuegiogi
4virtue
Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
virtue


Explanation:
credo che tu ti riferisca al sesto capitolo de "Il Principe", in cui si parla di conquistare i principati con le armi ma anche con la virtù - "De' Principati nuovi che s'acquistano con l'arme proprie e virtuosamente".

Giovanni


Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:26
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 626
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
strength, skill, prowess


Explanation:
There are a number of translations... up to you to choose one ;-)


In 1513 Machiavelli wrote his best-known work, Il Principe (The Prince). Dedicated to Lorenzo de' Medici, this little book offers practical advice on how to rule a city like sixteenth-century Florence. Its over-all theme is that the successful prince must exhibit virtù [variously translated as "strength," "skill," or "prowess"] in both favorable and adverse circumstances. This crucial quality of leadership is not the same as the virtuous character described by ethical philosophers, since Machiavelli held that public success and private morality are entirely separate. The question is not what makes a good human being, but what makes a good prince.


    Reference: http://www.philosophypages.com/hy/3v.htm
Hans Hereijgers
Local time: 09:26
Native speaker of: Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 4
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  CLS Lexi-tech: I tend to agree, since the Latin root "vir" (man, the virtues associated with manhood) is still active.
18 hrs

agree  Maureen Young: Yes--not "good", but "good at".
19 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Virtue


Explanation:
and Fortune. two of the main characteristics of the Prince.
anyway, see the site below.


    Reference: http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince00.htm
giogi
Local time: 08:26
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 176
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
virtù


Explanation:
There is no equivalent translation. If you look at books on 'The Prince' in English, you'll see that they leave the term in Italian, and add an explanation the first time it is mentioned. It's one of the key philosophical points in the book, so I think you should follow in the footsteps of distinguished scholars on the subject and leave the term in Italian.
The reason there is no equivalent is because it's a very complex term - it's based on the Latin word for man, 'vir', and expresses certain qualities Machiavelli thought a prince should have. It's a mixture of strength, acument and intellect - 'virtue' as we know it does not come into the equation, since it was not necessarily to a prince's advantage to be virtuous.
I studied the book at university, so I know what I'm talking about, more or less. I can certainly say that there's no equivalent.

Zaltys
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:26
PRO pts in pair: 12
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