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Istituti di...

English translation: I agree, I would leave it out (fundamentals)

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10:39 Nov 24, 2008
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Education / Pedagogy / Graduate school courses/exams
Italian term or phrase: Istituti di...
Istituti di Diritto Romano
Istituti di Diritto Civile
Istituti di Storia del Diritto Italiano

I'm translating a graduate certificate and there is a list of all the courses/exams this student has taken. Practically each one starts with "istituti di...". I tend to want to eliminate this term and only translate what comes after it as it really doesn't make much sense to say "institutes of..." before each one, but I want to make sure I'm not eliminating anything official. Would that be okay to do in this context?
hsaxton
Italy
Local time: 05:47
English translation:I agree, I would leave it out (fundamentals)
Explanation:
Ciao!
A mio avviso, istituti qui puoi tranquillamente ometterlo. E' una dicitura tipicamete italiana. Al massimo metterei "fundamentals"
Ciao, buon lavoro
Luca

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Note added at 31 mins (2008-11-24 11:11:24 GMT)
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Hi saxton. I'm afraid I have to disagree with my colleagues. Here "istituti" just means "istituzioni" as in this definition (have a look at number 6 and 7):
http://www.demauroparavia.it/60915
It has nothing to do with faculty, department or school :-)

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Note added at 37 mins (2008-11-24 11:17:09 GMT)
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It's just the way they call some courses, especially law courses. When you read "Istituti di diritto romano", it doesn't mean "departments of roman law". It just means "roman law" or, if you like, "fundamentals of roman law" (if you keep into consideration meaning 6 of the definition I gave you)
Selected response from:

xxxMaverick82
Local time: 05:47
Grading comment
Thank you Luca. I agree with you, especially since when the Italians refer to the name of their "esami", they are also refering to the name of the course they're taking and not to the department, faculty, etc it's in.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4I agree, I would leave it out (fundamentals)xxxMaverick82
4 +1Departments of...
Tom in London
4School of ...
Paul O'Brien
3Faculties of...Susan Gastaldi


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Faculties of...


Explanation:
I agree with Luca, but you could put Faculties of ... then list them, without putting Faculty of this, Faculty of that. I know they refer to separate schools, but the important thing is that they are university level (if I have understood correctly) and faculty should cover this meaning.

Susan Gastaldi
Local time: 05:47
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Departments of...


Explanation:
I can't understand why they're all in the plural but.. so what. Don't use "Faculties" because in Italian that would have been "Facolta".

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 70

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gian: ..at the Department of Roman Law and Ancient Legal History at the University ...
15 mins
  -> ? what's that? (and it contains mistakes)
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
I agree, I would leave it out (fundamentals)


Explanation:
Ciao!
A mio avviso, istituti qui puoi tranquillamente ometterlo. E' una dicitura tipicamete italiana. Al massimo metterei "fundamentals"
Ciao, buon lavoro
Luca

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 31 mins (2008-11-24 11:11:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hi saxton. I'm afraid I have to disagree with my colleagues. Here "istituti" just means "istituzioni" as in this definition (have a look at number 6 and 7):
http://www.demauroparavia.it/60915
It has nothing to do with faculty, department or school :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2008-11-24 11:17:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It's just the way they call some courses, especially law courses. When you read "Istituti di diritto romano", it doesn't mean "departments of roman law". It just means "roman law" or, if you like, "fundamentals of roman law" (if you keep into consideration meaning 6 of the definition I gave you)

xxxMaverick82
Local time: 05:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Italian
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you Luca. I agree with you, especially since when the Italians refer to the name of their "esami", they are also refering to the name of the course they're taking and not to the department, faculty, etc it's in.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fulvio & Sharon Baudo: Esatto! Come dire "Roman Law 101"
28 mins
  -> Ciao Sharon! :-)

agree  Juliette Scott
31 mins
  -> Ciao Juliette! :-)

agree  Rachel Fell: I think maybe "Principles" rather than "Fundamentals" http://www.unicatt.it/ECTS/Allegati/lm_giuris_giurisprudenza...
2 hrs

agree  Amy Williams: yes - nothing to do with departments/schools/faculties.
3 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
School of ...


Explanation:
just one example: http://www.google.it/search?q="school of law"&ie=utf-8&oe=ut...

"School of" is also used in the universities.

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Note added at 56 mins (2008-11-24 11:36:42 GMT) Post-grading
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sorry, i misunderstood the question. the COURSE is actually entitled "istituti di", and these are not the place where such courses are taught. right?

Paul O'Brien
Italy
Local time: 05:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 122
Notes to answerer
Asker: exactly. There's just a list of over 20 exams the student has taken and I'm translating the names of the exams/courses.

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Changes made by editors
Nov 24, 2008 - Changes made by writeaway:
FieldArt/Literary » Social Sciences
Field (specific)History » Education / Pedagogy


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