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collocati in aspettativa senza assegni

English translation: are granted unpaid leave

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:collocati in aspettativa senza assegni
English translation:are granted unpaid leave
Entered by: Alexander Chisholm
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

22:24 Feb 9, 2012
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Education / Pedagogy / study grants
Italian term or phrase: collocati in aspettativa senza assegni
Regarding the terms and conditions of a study fellowship

"4. I titolari di XX International Fellowships in servizio presso amministrazioni pubbliche sono collocati in aspettativa senza assegni"

Seconded on unpaid leave - something along those lines?
Alexander Chisholm
Local time: 19:18
are granted unpaid leave
Explanation:
E' previsto per coloro in servizio presso amministrazioni pubbliche

from IATE:
IT aspettativa senza assegni
EN unpaid leave

HIH

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 40 min (2012-02-09 23:05:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------



link:
http://www.lex.unict.it/eurolabor/ricerca/pagine/berretta/so...
Infine tutta quest'impalcatura legislativa è stata sconvolta dall'entrata in vigore dell'art. 71 del D.lgs. n. 29/93, il quale prevede l'aspettativa senza assegni per i dipendenti pubblici eletti alla carica di membri del Parlamento nazionale, europeo e dei Consigli regionali.


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Note added at 1 ora (2012-02-09 23:30:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Hi Alexander,
IMHO, to use **place** for collocare/ti isn't correct here, not
the right verb and difficult to phrase it. So, considering that **essere collocati in aspettative senza assegno** is a kind of favour because they are unpaid but can maintain their job place, I decided to use the verb to grant.
Hope this explains enough.




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 ore (2012-02-10 19:10:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Hi Alexander,
To my great surprise, it seems that the verb to place is of common use in the context. See links hereunder:

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-unpaid-leave.htm
Unpaid leave is time off from work which is provided without pay. When an employee takes or is given unpaid leave, he or she retains a position in a company, and many retain benefits as well, but the employee receives no salary. There are a number of reasons to take or institute this type of leave, and it is an option which is available from many companies. Employees who are curious about unpaid leave policies should talk to their supervisors or human resources directors, or read their employee manuals.
Many companies offer unpaid leave as a supplement to paid leave. For example, a company might give employees one week of paid leave each year, and allow employees to take up to three weeks of additional time off without pay, creating a month of combined time off. The time could be used for a vacation, to care for an ailing family member, or to engage in professional enrichment. Unpaid leave may also be allocated for employees who need to take sick days.
In some cases, a company may require employees to take unpaid leave, or a furlough1. This is done as a cost cutting measure, with the company preferring to force employees to take time off instead of eliminating positions at the company. This tactic is designed to retain employees during periods of economic hardship, and while it may be onerous to employees, many people prefer unpaid leave to uncertain layoffs.
Furlough1 comes to English from the Dutch word verlof. Ver means for, and lof translates to permission. We might translate lof as leave, as in leave of absence. Generally a furlough can be defined as just that, a leave of absence, which often requires permission. The word can also be used as noun or verb. A furlough refers to the temporary leave of absence, or a permission slip granting the leave, but a person can also be furloughed, or *****placed on leave*****.

http://www.ehow.com/info_12081198_can-unemployment-put-admin...
Administrative Leave Without Pay
• Employers sometimes ***place employees on unpaid administrative leave***. This occurs most often when an employee is under review for a potential workplace violation or a criminal matter. Employers do not terminate the employee until the review is completed. If an employer decides that an employee on unpaid administrative leave should retain employment, the employer must compensate the employee for the unpaid leave time. State laws limit the length of unpaid administrative leave, and some states limit when an employer can place an employee on unpaid leave. For example, Ohio state law allows an employer*** to place an employee on unpaid leave*** for no more than two months and only for felony crimes.

Therefore, it seems we've got no more doubts ....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 giorni15 min (2012-02-11 22:39:56 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------



Thanks indeed Alexander. Have a nice week-end. Grace
Selected response from:

tradu-grace
Italy
Local time: 19:18
Grading comment
Many thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1are granted unpaid leave
tradu-grace


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
are granted unpaid leave


Explanation:
E' previsto per coloro in servizio presso amministrazioni pubbliche

from IATE:
IT aspettativa senza assegni
EN unpaid leave

HIH

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 40 min (2012-02-09 23:05:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------



link:
http://www.lex.unict.it/eurolabor/ricerca/pagine/berretta/so...
Infine tutta quest'impalcatura legislativa è stata sconvolta dall'entrata in vigore dell'art. 71 del D.lgs. n. 29/93, il quale prevede l'aspettativa senza assegni per i dipendenti pubblici eletti alla carica di membri del Parlamento nazionale, europeo e dei Consigli regionali.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 ora (2012-02-09 23:30:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Hi Alexander,
IMHO, to use **place** for collocare/ti isn't correct here, not
the right verb and difficult to phrase it. So, considering that **essere collocati in aspettative senza assegno** is a kind of favour because they are unpaid but can maintain their job place, I decided to use the verb to grant.
Hope this explains enough.




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 ore (2012-02-10 19:10:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Hi Alexander,
To my great surprise, it seems that the verb to place is of common use in the context. See links hereunder:

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-unpaid-leave.htm
Unpaid leave is time off from work which is provided without pay. When an employee takes or is given unpaid leave, he or she retains a position in a company, and many retain benefits as well, but the employee receives no salary. There are a number of reasons to take or institute this type of leave, and it is an option which is available from many companies. Employees who are curious about unpaid leave policies should talk to their supervisors or human resources directors, or read their employee manuals.
Many companies offer unpaid leave as a supplement to paid leave. For example, a company might give employees one week of paid leave each year, and allow employees to take up to three weeks of additional time off without pay, creating a month of combined time off. The time could be used for a vacation, to care for an ailing family member, or to engage in professional enrichment. Unpaid leave may also be allocated for employees who need to take sick days.
In some cases, a company may require employees to take unpaid leave, or a furlough1. This is done as a cost cutting measure, with the company preferring to force employees to take time off instead of eliminating positions at the company. This tactic is designed to retain employees during periods of economic hardship, and while it may be onerous to employees, many people prefer unpaid leave to uncertain layoffs.
Furlough1 comes to English from the Dutch word verlof. Ver means for, and lof translates to permission. We might translate lof as leave, as in leave of absence. Generally a furlough can be defined as just that, a leave of absence, which often requires permission. The word can also be used as noun or verb. A furlough refers to the temporary leave of absence, or a permission slip granting the leave, but a person can also be furloughed, or *****placed on leave*****.

http://www.ehow.com/info_12081198_can-unemployment-put-admin...
Administrative Leave Without Pay
• Employers sometimes ***place employees on unpaid administrative leave***. This occurs most often when an employee is under review for a potential workplace violation or a criminal matter. Employers do not terminate the employee until the review is completed. If an employer decides that an employee on unpaid administrative leave should retain employment, the employer must compensate the employee for the unpaid leave time. State laws limit the length of unpaid administrative leave, and some states limit when an employer can place an employee on unpaid leave. For example, Ohio state law allows an employer*** to place an employee on unpaid leave*** for no more than two months and only for felony crimes.

Therefore, it seems we've got no more doubts ....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 giorni15 min (2012-02-11 22:39:56 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------



Thanks indeed Alexander. Have a nice week-end. Grace

tradu-grace
Italy
Local time: 19:18
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Many thanks.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Hi, I found that term in IATE. However, it was the word "collocati" that was causing problems.

Asker: yes, makes sense.

Asker: seems in common use


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Korovkin: put on unpaid leave. Granted sounds outright sadistic here! :) The most dangerous sadists, those... :))) "He was granted death penalty". Tah, your majesty! Oh, by the way, another version may be "given an unpaid leave". Cheers.
8 hrs
  -> Thanks Michael, you're right it may sound sadistic but it wasn't intentionally.
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