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codoli di fissaggio

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09:05 Feb 2, 2009
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Engineering (general) / Plumbing?
Italian term or phrase: codoli di fissaggio
These are used for connecting heating pipes to manifolds. AN engineer suggested compressin joints - but can anybody confirm this?
Sarah2
Italy
Local time: 00:03
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Summary of answers provided
3joint-end
Michael Korovkin
2tailMarie Scarano


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
tail


Explanation:
Surprisingly, here is another case where the most obvious appears to work. Apparently pipe tails is a very common term, often in connection with compression joints. Just google both individually and together, also with heating systems


    Reference: http://www.google.it/search?hl=it&client=firefox-a&channel=s...
Marie Scarano
Italy
Local time: 00:03
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
joint-end


Explanation:
"Codolo" is tale... but "fissaggio" ain't covered! "Tail joint" or "end joint" are attractive and sound better but somehow imply something already joined, that is, already fixed to another tale. "Codolo di fissaggio" is a tale-end that's used for affixing whateve you've got to something else you want to join it with.

We're in trouble here. Just "tail" is not enough. Codoli di fissaggio as a term are used for electrical condensors, street barriers, and even bombs! (for lenses too... i.e. "mount" in English... as in bayonet mount etc.) They can be round, square, triangular, polyedric, semi-circular in section, or even completely asymmetric.
So, the context is everything: we can't translate it with one English term for all cases.
If it's pipes, it can be simply joint-end (male and female as they may be referred to, oh yes, what a refined allusion!). I phoned around (2 engineers and my very own Italian plumber), I googled: join-end (for pipes, mind you) seems to be the safest


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Note added at 2 hrs (2009-02-02 11:28:44 GMT)
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sorry, I mean "tail" of course... tale è la mia concentrazione!

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Note added at 5 hrs (2009-02-02 14:48:37 GMT)
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Forget about the stud. Look: "codolo" (re. coda-tail) or the tail-end should be the integral part of the piece (the "sleeve" you see on the picture are probably some sort of a fixing band or ring). Just imagine a pipe with 10mm-thick walls, okay? Now, for the last, say, 10cm of one end, the pipe is 10mm smaller in diameter (both the outer and the bore). That's the "codolo di fissaggio maschio". And on the other end it's 10mm bigger in both the outer diameter and the bore: that's "codolo di fissaggio femmina". Thus you stick (fix/fit) those pipes to each other using their mutually fitting or JOINING ENDS. And don't be decieved by bands and rings put over the joint to keeìp it fast together. Nor should you heed the "codolo" definitions for other gadgets ... as I've said already. Hope it helps. Cheers.

Michael Korovkin
Italy
Local time: 00:03
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 16
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