KudoZ home » Italian to English » Food & Drink

zucchero granellato

English translation: granular/granulated sugar

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
08:45 Jun 18, 2005
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink / pastry ingredients
Italian term or phrase: zucchero granellato
Hi folks
This is a description of a croissant: "Croissant con zucchero granellato". No further context except that I am translating a list of different types of croissants and pastries with their ingredients for printing on the packaging. I can't find "zucchero granellato". Perhaps it could be translated simply as "sugar dusted croissant"? Or is it perhaps "caster sugar" or something more specific?
TIA
Derek
Derek Smith
Local time: 15:04
English translation:granular/granulated sugar
Explanation:
From my understanding, granulated sugar has coarser crystals, while caster sugar has finer crystals, giving a different texture to the end product. Maybe it's made with both types??!
Selected response from:

Fiona Grace Peterson
Italy
Local time: 15:04
Grading comment
Hi everybody and thanks for your massive response. This appeared to be a fairly simple matter but it has had me doing a lot of head-scratching given all the very valid comments you have made. I suspect "pearl sugar" might be what they're driving at as recommended by Catherine et al, but without a picture I'm not sure. Then there's "frosted" and "sugared" and all sorts of stuff like that. I originally chose "granulated" then sent a mail to the customer this morning proposing "pearl" and "sugared" but pointing out that product samples were essential.
The question remains unresolved, but the discussion is invaluable. I'll leave the glossary until the customer sends the scones.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +6granular/granulated sugar
Fiona Grace Peterson
4 +4pearl sugar
Catherine Bolton
5sugar grains
Silvia Prendin
4sugared croissant
Mario Calvagna
4frosted croissant
Alexander Chisholm
4sugar grain sprinkle
Daniela Zambrini
3 +1those small white pieces of icing sugar
writeaway


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
those small white pieces of icing sugar


Explanation:
used for decoration -those tiny (roundish)pieces of icing sugar used as decoration on top. if there is a fixed term for them in English is another matter....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 mins (2005-06-18 08:55:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(I no write too good English cause no had coffee yet).

writeaway
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fiona Grace Peterson: hmmm - could well be, those white extruded-type thingies (yum), what we really need is a picture :-)
20 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
granular/granulated sugar


Explanation:
From my understanding, granulated sugar has coarser crystals, while caster sugar has finer crystals, giving a different texture to the end product. Maybe it's made with both types??!

Fiona Grace Peterson
Italy
Local time: 15:04
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
Hi everybody and thanks for your massive response. This appeared to be a fairly simple matter but it has had me doing a lot of head-scratching given all the very valid comments you have made. I suspect "pearl sugar" might be what they're driving at as recommended by Catherine et al, but without a picture I'm not sure. Then there's "frosted" and "sugared" and all sorts of stuff like that. I originally chose "granulated" then sent a mail to the customer this morning proposing "pearl" and "sugared" but pointing out that product samples were essential.
The question remains unresolved, but the discussion is invaluable. I'll leave the glossary until the customer sends the scones.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carmen Schultz
2 mins

agree  Mario Calvagna: i agree, is simply granulated sugar, which is what in italy is standard sugar in supermarkets. you simply make the croissants and then sprinkle them with "granulated sugar".
7 mins

agree  Alexander Chisholm
33 mins

agree  ANJANA
37 mins

agree  Caterina Rebecchi
2 hrs

agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal
12 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
sugar grain sprinkle


Explanation:
http://www.kitchenkrafts.com/product.asp?product=IN0554PA

have a look at the picture in this link
http://www.cuisine-french.com/cgi/mdc/l/en/boutique/produits...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 29 mins (2005-06-18 09:15:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


White or Granulated Sugar is a highly refined cane or beet sugar. The most common and widely used form of sugar, it is also available in cube form.

Coarse Sugars Sugar Grains or Sugar Crystals have grains about 4 times the size of granulated sugar. Coarse sugars are often available in a rainbow of decorative colors in supermarkets and cake decorating supply shops.

Daniela Zambrini
Italy
Local time: 15:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 12
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
croissant con zucchero granellato
frosted croissant


Explanation:
The above explanation (granulated sugar)is fine for the term you asked.

For the whole phrase though I would use "frosted croissant", sugra coating very often being referred to as "frosting"


    cincinnati.com/freetime/dining/ reviews/090800_jalexanders.html
Alexander Chisholm
Local time: 15:04
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
pearl sugar


Explanation:
Hi Derek,
Take a look at the excellent sugar site below. It lists sugar of all kinds (and shapes!). I think pearl sugar may be what you need here, defined as follows. Though pearl sugar is indeed granulated, the finer type is what first pops into my mind when I hear "granulated sugar", so this would solve that problem.
HTH,
Catherine

Pearl Sugar
Also called Decorative or Sanding Sugar
Lumps of refined sugar particles
Used as a decoration in baking



    Reference: http:///www.sugar.ca/faqGen.htm
Catherine Bolton
Local time: 15:04
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: I think pearl sugar is the term that eluded me (as in 100%)
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  Linda 969: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Glossary/S.htm
1 hr
  -> Cool link. Thanks!

agree  manducci: Hi Catherine. I used to be a dessert and cake chef and this is definitely the correct term.
3 hrs
  -> Not a bad job, eh? ;-)

agree  Grace Anderson
3 hrs
  -> Hi Grace!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
sugar grains


Explanation:
Please check the link below to see what granella looks like. It can also be used as an ingredient.


    Reference: http://www.diciaccio.com/prodpage2.html
Silvia Prendin
Italy
Local time: 15:04
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
sugared croissant


Explanation:
i agree with the literal translation given by fiona (see my post on her answer). however if this is going on the packaging as "name" it would be a bit to long to translate the whole sentence as "croissant with granulated sugar", and people would probably get confused. If the product is indeed a croissant with granulated sugar sprinkled on top after cooking, i would simply translate the whole sentence into "sugared croissant". This would be, to the brits, a croissant sprinkled with sugar. the correct choice should really be based on marketing implications

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 42 mins (2005-06-18 09:27:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(continuation)
and on how important the word \"granellato\" really is in the context (in my opinion not important at all)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2005-06-18 09:32:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry not had my coffe either so keep hitting the wrong button.

so i would personally do as follows:

if is going in as name of the product: \"sugared croissant\"
if is going in as product description (say under the name) \"croissant sprinkled with granulated sugar\" as per fiona\'s translation.

again sorry for being so tedious

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 21 mins (2005-06-18 12:07:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

after seeing the posts i asked a british chef. he also is of the opinion the sugared croissant is the clearer description to the product. but is up to you

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs 53 mins (2005-06-18 21:38:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

On second thought probably the best is for us to be able to sample the goods. So you could send us one each of this croissants so that we can view and taste them. this will allow us to come up with the definitive definition

Mario Calvagna
Local time: 14:04
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search