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mi smazzero il lavoro da sola

English translation: I'll plough through it on my own

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15:05 Aug 2, 2006
Italian to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Italian term or phrase: mi smazzero il lavoro da sola
preceded by: Tornando al lavoro vedro di fare il possibile ... mi smazzero il lavoro da sola

Is this a slang term?
GillW (MCIL)
Local time: 13:34
English translation:I'll plough through it on my own
Explanation:
gives the idea that it'll be a hard job
Selected response from:

Claire Titchmarsh
Local time: 14:34
Grading comment
all the answers were possible (didn't like the 'it' in slog it away though)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4I'll slog it away (on my own)
Umberto Cassano
3 +4to deal out/"work one's butt off"
rugiada
3 +4I'll take care of things by myself; I'll find someone to get the work doneWendellR
4 +1I'll plough through it on my ownClaire Titchmarsh


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
I'll take care of things by myself; I'll find someone to get the work done


Explanation:
My take is that it's dialettale, but a madrelingua will surely answer with a better ear.

Smazzare (from "mazzo") means, as far as I know, to deal (in the sense of to deal/distribute cards, but also means to deal drugs; a 'smazzone' is a 'spacciatore'). It can also mean to "spread around" or "give out": The guys who go around handing out bigliettini for discos ('Ladies' Night! Free Beer!') also smazzano; people with lots of gmail accounts to give away say they've got "50 inviti a gmail da smazzare".

None of which helps precisely because the meaning may still be off. Unless she's saying that she's going to "find someone to do the work" for her, which strikes me as possible, my feeling is that she's saying she'll "manage," she'll "figure something out on her own," or something along those lines.

FWIW/HIH!

WendellR
Local time: 14:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Linda 969: with the first option
5 mins

agree  rugiada: sorry, I was writing mine and did not see your comment
7 mins

agree  Patricia Crotty
18 mins

agree  Giorgio Testa: "smazzare" is clearly related to "farsi il mazzo" in this case
29 mins
  -> Ah, that helps. Here are some options, then: to slog/sweat one's guts out, to work one's tail/butt/ass off, to sweat blood, to knock oneself out
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
to deal out/"work one's butt off"


Explanation:
"Smazzare" means to deal (out), like cards. The term is used in gaming. The meaning might be: she will go through her work and sort it out by herself. Another option might be that she is using slang (but in that case it should be "smazziare", "farsi il mazzo", really slang) meaning: she will take all the work on herself and "work her butt off".

Hope it helps,

Ciao!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2006-08-02 15:25:12 GMT)
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Sorry, too late!

rugiada
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  WendellR: Ah, but "work one's butt off" is really good!
9 mins

agree  Giorgio Testa: definitely not related to dealing out: "da sola" would be inconsistent.
19 mins

agree  missdutch: with Giorgio
1 hr

agree  Liliana Roman-Hamilton: si' secondo me e' legato a "farsi un mazzo" quindi userei "I'll work my butt off", dato che si tratta di una conversazione.
3 hrs
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
I'll slog it away (on my own)


Explanation:
"Smazzare " (smazzerò is future tense) is an informal expression which means "work very hard" and can be rendered with the english equivalents "slog away" "peg away" etc....

An occurrence found in a blog : "I just hope that my dad had a good sunday resting at home and didn't slog it away doing housechores."

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Note added at 38 mins (2006-08-02 15:43:34 GMT)
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From "Scrostati gaggio! Dizionario Storico dei lingaggi giovanili", 2004, UTET Libreria,

The folloowing is the lexical entry of "smazzare" (+ its pronominal form) in this Dictionary of Youth Slang and Jargon forms (p. 422) :

SMAZZARE : "Svolgere un'incombenza faticosa, sorbire una situazione difficile"
SMAZZARSELA : "darsi da fare, sbattersi"

You could also use SLAVE AWAY, WORK ONE'S FINGERS TO THE BONE which are as informal as the italian expression


    Reference: http://mintia.blogspot.com/2005_06_01_mintia_archive.html
Umberto Cassano
Italy
Local time: 14:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Italian
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  WendellR: I like "slog away at"; I've never heard "slog it away," but it might be a BE/AE difference.
3 mins
  -> Thanks Wendell ! I had the same doubts about the target dialect

agree  Giorgio Testa
15 mins
  -> Grazie Giorgio

agree  Di Salvatore
45 mins
  -> grazie

agree  missdutch
1 hr
  -> grazie
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
I'll plough through it on my own


Explanation:
gives the idea that it'll be a hard job

Claire Titchmarsh
Local time: 14:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
all the answers were possible (didn't like the 'it' in slog it away though)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Umberto Cassano: Informality and idiomaticity go hand in hand. I like your translation !
6 hrs
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