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cardine

English translation: cardus

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:cardine, cardo
English translation:cardus
Entered by: xlationhouse
Options:
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21:42 Mar 15, 2007
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - History
Italian term or phrase: cardine
For a tourist magazine article about Concordia Sagittaria:

Ancora oggi, il visitatore che decide di percorrere in auto cardini e decumani della centuriazione romana di questa zona, può riconoscere le vestigia del passato della città e del territorio.

I believe decumanus is a main road and centuriation is the grid laid out by Roman city-planners. I know cardine is defined as hinge, but what is it in this context?

Thanks!
xlationhouse
United States
Local time: 10:02
cardo
Explanation:
Hi
I think you need to use the Latin term - and I wouldn't add an explanation as there is none in Italian


http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardine_(storia_romana)
Il cardine (cardo) è una via che corre in linea di massima in senso nord-sud nelle città romane basate su uno schema urbanistico ortogonale, ossia suddivise in isolati quadrangolari uniformi, in particolare per quanto riguarda le fondazioni coloniali

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardo
In ancient Roman city planning, a cardo or cardus was a north-south-oriented street in cities, military camps, and coloniae. Sometimes called the cardus maximus, the cardo served as the center of economic life. The street was lined with shops, merchants, and vendors.



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Note added at 57 mins (2007-03-15 22:39:25 GMT)
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Yup!

In Roman city planning, a decumanus was an east-west-oriented road in a Roman city, castra (military camp), or colonia. The main decumanus was the Decumanus Maximus, which normally connected the Porta Praetoria (in a military camp, closest to the enemy) to the Porta Decumana (away from the enemy).





Selected response from:

Linda 969
Local time: 19:02
Grading comment
Thanks for the very helpful answer & refs, and for everyone's comments!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6cardo
Linda 969
4 -1foundation / cornerstone
Emanuela Galdelli


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
foundation / cornerstone


Explanation:
that's what I found on the Sansoni dictionary. I think it's that.
hih

Emanuela Galdelli
Italy
Local time: 19:02
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Linda 969: Hi Emanuela - not in this context
14 mins
  -> ok, Linda
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
cardo


Explanation:
Hi
I think you need to use the Latin term - and I wouldn't add an explanation as there is none in Italian


http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardine_(storia_romana)
Il cardine (cardo) è una via che corre in linea di massima in senso nord-sud nelle città romane basate su uno schema urbanistico ortogonale, ossia suddivise in isolati quadrangolari uniformi, in particolare per quanto riguarda le fondazioni coloniali

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardo
In ancient Roman city planning, a cardo or cardus was a north-south-oriented street in cities, military camps, and coloniae. Sometimes called the cardus maximus, the cardo served as the center of economic life. The street was lined with shops, merchants, and vendors.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 57 mins (2007-03-15 22:39:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yup!

In Roman city planning, a decumanus was an east-west-oriented road in a Roman city, castra (military camp), or colonia. The main decumanus was the Decumanus Maximus, which normally connected the Porta Praetoria (in a military camp, closest to the enemy) to the Porta Decumana (away from the enemy).







Linda 969
Local time: 19:02
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Thanks for the very helpful answer & refs, and for everyone's comments!
Notes to answerer
Asker: So, cardus = north-south road and decumanus = east-west road (as I've also read)?

Asker: Great: I think I'll use cardus (plural cardi) and decumanus (plural decumani). I'll probably put a note in parentheses and let the magazine's editor decide if he wants to keep it or not. Thanks!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alfredo Tutino: ciao Linda!
2 hrs
  -> ciao Alfredo :-)

agree  James (Jim) Davis: Like avenues and streets in New York I think (I'm a Brit so I aint sure"
7 hrs
  -> yup, streets run east-west and avenues run north-south

agree  Valeria Faber
7 hrs
  -> thanks, Valeria

agree  missdutch
8 hrs
  -> thanks :-)

agree  xxxsilvia b
9 hrs
  -> thanks!

agree  Gian
11 hrs
  -> thanks, Gian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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