KudoZ home » Italian to English » Investment / Securities

Fatte salve le Linee di Indirizzo

English translation: subject to

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:Fatte salve le Linee di Indirizzo
English translation:subject to
Entered by: John Wellesly Helliwell
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

13:45 Nov 26, 2006
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Investment / Securities / asset management agreement
Italian term or phrase: Fatte salve le Linee di Indirizzo
Context: Fatte salve le Linee di Indirizzo e qualsiasi accordo di retrocessione di commissioni descritto nell’Allegato B, il Gestore può a sua discrezione investire il Conto in qualsiasi fondo ...".
The expression *fatto salvo /fatte salve* and other variants, e.g. "Fatto salvo quanto previsto ..." occur several times in the text of the agreement. Sometimes it seems to mean "notwithstanding" and other times *as laid down ..."

Is there a general expression in English that covers such variants? Also "le Linee di Indirizzo" - General Terms of Reference - or General Guidlines?
John Wellesly Helliwell
Italy
Local time: 18:56
subject to
Explanation:
fatte salve/salvo means subject to.

It is the opposite of notwithstanding, which would mean that the Linee di Indirizzo could be ignored. This is a classic example of incorrect glossary entries that need cleaning up: I see that "notwithstanding" and "without prejudice to" have been given as alternatives when in fact they have completely different meanings: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/272912

Without prejudice to or subject to means that the content of the document or law in question must take priority and be observed. "Notwithstanding" means "in deroga a", (if you look it up in the OED it says "in spite of" which clearly means it can be ignored).

Here the Gestore can invest in any fondo he likes, unless there is something in the Linee di Indirizzo that restricts him. Notwithstanding the guidelines would mean that he can ignore the guidelines, which is not what the writer is saying.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2006-11-26 14:02:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

paragraph 2 of my explanation should be worded more clearly "if you look up "notwitstanding" in the OED it says "in spite of" which clearly means that the document or issue at hand can be ignored).
Selected response from:

Claire Titchmarsh
Local time: 18:56
Grading comment
Thanks Claire - *subject to* is wonderful in saying everything and nothing, i.e. you can or you can't depending ... (*save for what is not allowed or allowed by/under ...etc,*) Great help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3subject to
Claire Titchmarsh


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
subject to


Explanation:
fatte salve/salvo means subject to.

It is the opposite of notwithstanding, which would mean that the Linee di Indirizzo could be ignored. This is a classic example of incorrect glossary entries that need cleaning up: I see that "notwithstanding" and "without prejudice to" have been given as alternatives when in fact they have completely different meanings: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/272912

Without prejudice to or subject to means that the content of the document or law in question must take priority and be observed. "Notwithstanding" means "in deroga a", (if you look it up in the OED it says "in spite of" which clearly means it can be ignored).

Here the Gestore can invest in any fondo he likes, unless there is something in the Linee di Indirizzo that restricts him. Notwithstanding the guidelines would mean that he can ignore the guidelines, which is not what the writer is saying.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2006-11-26 14:02:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

paragraph 2 of my explanation should be worded more clearly "if you look up "notwitstanding" in the OED it says "in spite of" which clearly means that the document or issue at hand can be ignored).

Claire Titchmarsh
Local time: 18:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks Claire - *subject to* is wonderful in saying everything and nothing, i.e. you can or you can't depending ... (*save for what is not allowed or allowed by/under ...etc,*) Great help!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxDCypher
13 mins

agree  Enza Longo
30 mins

agree  stefania da prato: si..é proprio così...
50 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search