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dante causa

English translation: the deceased

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:dante causa
English translation:the deceased
Entered by: Jean Martin
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23:17 Aug 30, 2006
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Law (general) / legal terminology
Italian term or phrase: dante causa
This term appears in the body of a declaration concerning someone who died without leaving a will, and listing the legitimate heirs, viz. "... pertanto gli unici eredi sono...." - followed by:
Grado di parentela con il "avente causa".
Although I have found two translations of this term (relating to patents), I am not sure whether "assignor", etc. may be appropriate in this context, and I would be grateful for a more precise suggestion that better fits the above context.
Thanks, as always, luke
Luke
Local time: 17:29
the deceased
Explanation:
In general, a person by, through, from, or under whom another claims.

There are several terms given in de Franchis for "dante causa", one of which is assignor. The others are predecessor in title, deceased person, alienor, propositus. He makes the point that there is no direct equivalent in English under the law of succession. In your context I would be tempted to use "the deceased"
Selected response from:

Jean Martin
Local time: 08:29
Grading comment
Thank you, Jean,
"the deceased" seems to be the most appropriate in this context. Thanks also the other colleagues who have kindly offered their suggestions.
Ciao, luke
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4the deceased
Jean Martin
4assignor.garrett higgins
3Undue Payment/....the office proceeds to make the undue paymentAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Undue Payment/....the office proceeds to make the undue payment


Explanation:
Does this make sense Luke?

http://forum.wordreference.com/archive/index.php?t-78360.htm...

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 09:29
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 37
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
assignor.


Explanation:
As you say, "assignor", that is, a person from whom a right has been assigned.


    Reference: http://www.garzantilinguistica.it/interna_eng.html
garrett higgins
Local time: 08:29
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 15
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
the deceased


Explanation:
In general, a person by, through, from, or under whom another claims.

There are several terms given in de Franchis for "dante causa", one of which is assignor. The others are predecessor in title, deceased person, alienor, propositus. He makes the point that there is no direct equivalent in English under the law of succession. In your context I would be tempted to use "the deceased"

Jean Martin
Local time: 08:29
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 598
Grading comment
Thank you, Jean,
"the deceased" seems to be the most appropriate in this context. Thanks also the other colleagues who have kindly offered their suggestions.
Ciao, luke

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Grace Anderson
19 mins
  -> thanks Grace

agree  xxxAdrian MM.: kudoZ entries of assignor don't make sense on an intestacy
2 hrs

agree  claire restivo
6 hrs

agree  Thomas Roberts: "assignor" is no good in a will.
11 hrs
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