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piano rialzato

English translation: raised ground floor

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:piano rialzato
English translation:raised ground floor
Entered by: Grace Anderson
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10:55 Mar 22, 2002
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Italian term or phrase: piano rialzato
There are three floors in this building "seminterrato, piano rialzato and primo piano" What should I can the "piano rialzato" ?
Grace Anderson
Italy
Local time: 10:54
Clarification
Explanation:
This sounds rather like a lot of (esp.) 19th century town houses in the UK, where, from the street, there are steps DOWN to what's called an "area" with a door to the (semi-) basement, but also steps UP to the main front door leading in to the (slightly raised) ground floor.

However, although you might possibly refer to a semi-basement I don't think I've ever heard anyone talking about a "raised ground floor". So I think you're probably better off just saying "ground floor" here.
Selected response from:

Gillian Hargreaves
Local time: 09:54
Grading comment
I've just checked on Google and actually there are loads of hits ( more than 700) for "raised ground floor" so I think I'll put it in to be more precise. Thanks very much everyone
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5ground floor
Enza Longo
3 +1Clarification
Gillian Hargreaves
4mezzaninewdh


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
ground floor


Explanation:
it would make sense that between the basement level and the first floor there should be a ground floor.

Enza Longo
Canada
Local time: 04:54
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 694
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
mezzanine


Explanation:
It does seem strange that there is absolutely no ground floor, but if this is so then it has to be a mezzanine floor.David

wdh
Local time: 10:54
PRO pts in pair: 34
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Clarification


Explanation:
This sounds rather like a lot of (esp.) 19th century town houses in the UK, where, from the street, there are steps DOWN to what's called an "area" with a door to the (semi-) basement, but also steps UP to the main front door leading in to the (slightly raised) ground floor.

However, although you might possibly refer to a semi-basement I don't think I've ever heard anyone talking about a "raised ground floor". So I think you're probably better off just saying "ground floor" here.

Gillian Hargreaves
Local time: 09:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 236
Grading comment
I've just checked on Google and actually there are loads of hits ( more than 700) for "raised ground floor" so I think I'll put it in to be more precise. Thanks very much everyone

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  luskie
6 mins
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