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STATO DI FATTO E DI DIRITTO

English translation: "in fact or under law" ((see below))

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17:26 Aug 10, 2000
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Italian term or phrase: STATO DI FATTO E DI DIRITTO
La predetta unita' e' garantita da venditori, libera e disponibile, esente da vincoli, gravami, privilegi anche fiscali, nello stato di fatto e di diritto come si possiede
Emanuela
English translation:"in fact or under law" ((see below))
Explanation:
The sense of the Italian is this: "The sellers hereby guarantee that the said unit, as held by them, is unencumbered and available, free from liens and/or mortgages, and not subject to the payment of fees, including taxes, either _de facto_ or _de jure_ [i.e., in fact or under law]."

The Latin phases "de facto" and "de jure" often appear in English real-estate purchase contracts. The term "de facto" refers to actions, events, or conditions that may be acceptable for practical purposes, but which are actually illegal. The term "de jure" describes a condition in which all legal requirements have been met, in this sense, "de jure" is the contrary of "de facto."

As I mentioned in an answer to another query involving Latin legal phrases, the best approach I've found is to include the Latin, in italics, followed by a short English explanation in brackets. Hope this helps!






Selected response from:

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 06:00
Grading comment
Thank you for your explanation, it was very helpful.

Emanuela
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naDe facto and de jureTelesforo Fernandez
na"in fact or under law" ((see below))Heathcliff
naBased on fact and reason
Luis Luis


  

Answers


6 mins
Based on fact and reason


Explanation:
I think it can be summarized as:

"based on the rights (of the vendors)."


Ciao.

Luis M. Luis

Luis Luis
United States
Local time: 08:00
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 45

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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1 hr
"in fact or under law" ((see below))


Explanation:
The sense of the Italian is this: "The sellers hereby guarantee that the said unit, as held by them, is unencumbered and available, free from liens and/or mortgages, and not subject to the payment of fees, including taxes, either _de facto_ or _de jure_ [i.e., in fact or under law]."

The Latin phases "de facto" and "de jure" often appear in English real-estate purchase contracts. The term "de facto" refers to actions, events, or conditions that may be acceptable for practical purposes, but which are actually illegal. The term "de jure" describes a condition in which all legal requirements have been met, in this sense, "de jure" is the contrary of "de facto."

As I mentioned in an answer to another query involving Latin legal phrases, the best approach I've found is to include the Latin, in italics, followed by a short English explanation in brackets. Hope this helps!









    Black's Law Dictionary (6th ed., 1992)
    Dizionario Enciclopedico Economico e Commerciale IT<>EN (2nd ed., Zanichelli, 1994)
Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 06:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 504
Grading comment
Thank you for your explanation, it was very helpful.

Emanuela
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 hrs
De facto and de jure


Explanation:

You can keep the latin expresion which is well know.

Telesforo Fernandez
Local time: 18:30
PRO pts in pair: 110
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