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scevà

English translation: sheva

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:scevà
English translation:sheva
Entered by: Sarah Ponting
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07:18 May 26, 2002
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics / linguistics
Italian term or phrase: scevà
Linguistics, in a text on the origins of the Etruscan language:

"...la seconda a di daavat è una specie di scevà ebraico".

Sounds like it should be a Hebrew letter, but I haven't been able to find it. The client says it corresponds to Greek shevà, but that doesn't help me!
Sarah Ponting
Italy
Local time: 12:26
sheva
Explanation:
Schwa



[Late 19c: from German schwa, from Hebrew shwa, from shaw', emptiness. Hebrew grammarians traditionally mark consonants with signs referred to in Roman lettering as sheva or shewa. These signs indicate either no following vowel sound (quiescent sheva) or a following central vowel (vocal or movable sheva). There was nothing comparable in alphabets derived from Roman until the development of the International Phonetic Alphabet in the late 19c, when an inverted e was introduced to serve the same purpose as vocal sheva]. Also shwa, neutral vowel, obscure vowel. A term in phonetics for a central vowel sound represented by the symbol /[schwa]/. To make a schwa in isolation, the tongue is neither pushed forward nor pulled back, neither raised nor lowered, and the lips are neither spread nor rounded: hence the term 'neutral'. Although not represented in the conventional alphabet, schwa is the commonest vowel sound in English. It typically occurs in unstressed syllables, and in the following list is shown for illustrative purposes as if it were an everyday letter: [schwa]bove, [schwa]gain, s[schwa]ppose, phot[schwa]graph, scen[schwa]ry, sof[schwa]. It is often an ill-defined voice gap between consonants: for example, in today it is formed as the tongue moves away from the alveolar ridge on the release of /t/ and returns to form /d/ (t'day). Many languages do not have a neutral vowel, and this causes problems for foreign speakers of English from such backgrounds. However, another vowel may replace it: for example, the short /a/ of North Indian languages (as in the first vowel of Punjab) is used as a schwa in IndE, or the /a/ in many kinds of AfrE: speaker /spika/. Learners who have not had access to native-speaker English tend not to attempt a schwa at all, but to pronounce words more or less according to the vowel letters of the spelling. Their speech is therefore likely to be syllable-timed rather than stress-timed. See Rhythm, Syllable, Weak Vowel, Vowel, Vowel Quantity, and, in particular, the letter entries A, E, I, O, R, U.

Selected response from:

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 11:26
Grading comment
Thanks a lot.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5vocalisation mark OR schwa
Mario Marcolin
4 +1sheva
Francesco D'Alessandro


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
sheva


Explanation:
Schwa



[Late 19c: from German schwa, from Hebrew shwa, from shaw', emptiness. Hebrew grammarians traditionally mark consonants with signs referred to in Roman lettering as sheva or shewa. These signs indicate either no following vowel sound (quiescent sheva) or a following central vowel (vocal or movable sheva). There was nothing comparable in alphabets derived from Roman until the development of the International Phonetic Alphabet in the late 19c, when an inverted e was introduced to serve the same purpose as vocal sheva]. Also shwa, neutral vowel, obscure vowel. A term in phonetics for a central vowel sound represented by the symbol /[schwa]/. To make a schwa in isolation, the tongue is neither pushed forward nor pulled back, neither raised nor lowered, and the lips are neither spread nor rounded: hence the term 'neutral'. Although not represented in the conventional alphabet, schwa is the commonest vowel sound in English. It typically occurs in unstressed syllables, and in the following list is shown for illustrative purposes as if it were an everyday letter: [schwa]bove, [schwa]gain, s[schwa]ppose, phot[schwa]graph, scen[schwa]ry, sof[schwa]. It is often an ill-defined voice gap between consonants: for example, in today it is formed as the tongue moves away from the alveolar ridge on the release of /t/ and returns to form /d/ (t'day). Many languages do not have a neutral vowel, and this causes problems for foreign speakers of English from such backgrounds. However, another vowel may replace it: for example, the short /a/ of North Indian languages (as in the first vowel of Punjab) is used as a schwa in IndE, or the /a/ in many kinds of AfrE: speaker /spika/. Learners who have not had access to native-speaker English tend not to attempt a schwa at all, but to pronounce words more or less according to the vowel letters of the spelling. Their speech is therefore likely to be syllable-timed rather than stress-timed. See Rhythm, Syllable, Weak Vowel, Vowel, Vowel Quantity, and, in particular, the letter entries A, E, I, O, R, U.




    Reference: http://216.239.51.100/search?q=cache:2orymwAfjZMC:www.xrefer...
Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 11:26
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks a lot.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Angela C.: In linguistics is called this way
18 mins
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
vocalisation mark OR schwa


Explanation:
"scevà ebraico" Two meanings
1)
vocalisation marks used in Hebrew writing. As you may know, Hebrew is basically a consonantal script where the diacritical marking of vowel sounds
is more or less optional depending on context and style.

2)in phonetics schwa (scevà) is a technical term, se quote.

If your text is about writing my guess is that you translate best with vocalisation mark.


"The name comes from the Hebrew point system devised to indicate vowels in a writing system that normally didn't use them. The phoneme and the associated grapheme - a turned e [] - were identified in the late 19th Century. It has been part of the IPA (InternationalPhonetic Association) notation since it was first published in 1897."


    Reference: http://victorian.fortunecity.com/vangogh/555/Spell/shwa.htm
Mario Marcolin
Sweden
Local time: 12:26
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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