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normodotati e certificati

English translation: non-disabled and disabled with certificate of level of impairment

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:normodotati e certificati
English translation:non-disabled and disabled with certificate of level of impairment
Entered by: Hege Jakobsen Lepri
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12:12 Dec 12, 2001
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Italian term or phrase: normodotati e certificati
This is an odd pair of terms, indicating the 2 groups represented in a "Cooperativa Tipo B". I know the meaning (normal/ handicapped - equipped with a certificate stating the level of the impairment). In Italian it sounds aweful in its attempt to avoid stigmatizing the handicapped group. if anyone has an elegant way of putting it in English I'd be more than grateful.
Hege Jakobsen Lepri
Local time: 23:22
non-disabled and disabled with certificate of level of impairment
Explanation:
I know, long-winded. But you can hardly say "normal" -- as "abnormal" is what immediately comes to mind as the opposite term.
FYI, there is a big move now to avoid the use of the term "handicapped" altogether and the most popular (and polite) term now is "disabled".
Moreover, "impaired" is used often, as in the following examples: the deaf are now referred to as "hearing impaired" and I have seen "visually impaired" used in reference to the blind.
You can check the sight listed below (see the sidebar) for an example of how this is being used.
I realize I've gone off the main track here, but it may be of help to you with your text as a whole.
Selected response from:

Catherine Bolton
Local time: 05:22
Grading comment
Thanks, I believe I really hoped for a miracle here, but obviously it's hard to get down to two simple terms without being offensive... i think I'll omit the certificate-part or use it in a note. Thanks for the link!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5non-disabled and disabled with certificate of level of impairment
Catherine Bolton


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
non-disabled and disabled with certificate of level of impairment


Explanation:
I know, long-winded. But you can hardly say "normal" -- as "abnormal" is what immediately comes to mind as the opposite term.
FYI, there is a big move now to avoid the use of the term "handicapped" altogether and the most popular (and polite) term now is "disabled".
Moreover, "impaired" is used often, as in the following examples: the deaf are now referred to as "hearing impaired" and I have seen "visually impaired" used in reference to the blind.
You can check the sight listed below (see the sidebar) for an example of how this is being used.
I realize I've gone off the main track here, but it may be of help to you with your text as a whole.


    Reference: http://www.phonemerchants.com/
Catherine Bolton
Local time: 05:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1906
Grading comment
Thanks, I believe I really hoped for a miracle here, but obviously it's hard to get down to two simple terms without being offensive... i think I'll omit the certificate-part or use it in a note. Thanks for the link!
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