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colore effettivo di chevrenil,

English translation: Law of Simultaneous Contrast of Colors

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:legge del contrasto simultaneo dei colori
English translation:Law of Simultaneous Contrast of Colors
Entered by: Brigitte Gendebien
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01:55 Mar 19, 2001
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Science
Italian term or phrase: colore effettivo di chevrenil,
Hi folks, this appears in a text about the design of operating theatres, in a list of desirable features, as shown below.
Can somebody please dewhelm me?!
Thanks for your valuable help
Derek

...asepsi, resistenza chimica e fotochimica, resistenza meccanica, continuit e raccordabilit, colore effettivo di chevrenil, ininfiammabilit...
xxxdsmith
Local time: 08:14
I think it's Chevreuil...
Explanation:
Sources of 19th Century Color Theory:

M.E. Chevreuil, De loi du contraste simultané des couleurs (1839). -- simultaneous contrast, complementary halos, optical mixture. (http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/fnart/fa257/color_notes.htm...


Inspired by the 19th century color theories of Eugène Chevreuil and Ogden Rood and their concept of simultaneous color contrast-the combination of contrasting colors on the canvas -Delaunay believed that he could realize a new "pure painting", a painting that is all light and all movement.
(http://www.guggenheim.org/exhibitions/past_exhibitions/delau...

Study for "A Sunday on La Grande Jatte", 1884–85, Georges-Pierre Seurat (French, 1859–1891). Oil on canvas; 27 3/4 x 41 in. (70.5 x 104.1 cm) Bequest of Sam A. Lewisohn, 1951.
This painting is Seurat's final sketch for his masterpiece, "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte" (The Art Institute of Chicago). The much larger, finished version was shown in the eighth Impressionist exhibition in 1886. Seurat analyzed the elements of his composition with nearly scientific care in at least thirty-two preparatory drawings and paintings. The scene depicted is an island in the Seine where working-class Parisians strolled, relaxed, and fished on Sundays. In a letter of 1890, Seurat states that he began work on the final canvas about August 15, 1884. In October 1885 he met Camille Pissarro and, following his advice, repainted the canvas using pigments that by 1892 had begun to lose their brilliance. The present study provides, therefore, a record of the chromatic intensity which the artist intended to achieve in the full-scale painting. As in the final work, the sketch juxtaposes contrasting pigments and depends on optical mixture—the phenomenon that causes two tones seen at a distance to form a single hue—to create the desired effect. Seurat based his knowledge of the science of color on the technical treatises of M. E. Chevreuil ("On the Law of the Simultaneous Contrast of Colors," 1839) and O. N. Rood ("Modern Chromatics," 1879). In this sketch, the pigments are woven together with small, patchy brushstrokes, while in the final painting Seurat used the small dots characteristic of his pointillist technique. After the sketch was finished, he restretched the canvas and added the border at the edge.
(http://michla2000.tripod.com/nycity.html)

Selected response from:

Brigitte Gendebien
Belgium
Local time: 08:14
Grading comment
Thanks indeed for your assistance. My apologies for taking so long to get back to you, but I was waiting for my customer to send me the explanatory fax that I was promised when I queried this expression. As often happens however, the more I waited, the less the fax arrived. In the end I scrubbed the entire concept from the transalation and appended a note to that effect. Thanks Angela for your pointer to a site of relevance to "Chevrenil", but given the scarcity of hits and the fact that my customer did mumble something about "colour theory" on the phone, I've decided to choose Brigitte's very diligent answer. If I ever do get any intelligible feedback from these people, I promise I will pass it on to you.
Thanks again
Derek
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naM.E. Chevreul
Brigitte Gendebien
naI think it's Chevreuil...
Brigitte Gendebien
nahi derek
Angela Arnone


  

Answers


1 hr
hi derek


Explanation:
You just after the chevrenil or other stuff as well?
I found a site that says that "chevrenil" is an undesirable effect caused by refracted light in operating theatres.
Do you think this could be "glare"???
Angela



    braendl website
Angela Arnone
Local time: 08:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3602
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
I think it's Chevreuil...


Explanation:
Sources of 19th Century Color Theory:

M.E. Chevreuil, De loi du contraste simultané des couleurs (1839). -- simultaneous contrast, complementary halos, optical mixture. (http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/fnart/fa257/color_notes.htm...


Inspired by the 19th century color theories of Eugène Chevreuil and Ogden Rood and their concept of simultaneous color contrast-the combination of contrasting colors on the canvas -Delaunay believed that he could realize a new "pure painting", a painting that is all light and all movement.
(http://www.guggenheim.org/exhibitions/past_exhibitions/delau...

Study for "A Sunday on La Grande Jatte", 1884–85, Georges-Pierre Seurat (French, 1859–1891). Oil on canvas; 27 3/4 x 41 in. (70.5 x 104.1 cm) Bequest of Sam A. Lewisohn, 1951.
This painting is Seurat's final sketch for his masterpiece, "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte" (The Art Institute of Chicago). The much larger, finished version was shown in the eighth Impressionist exhibition in 1886. Seurat analyzed the elements of his composition with nearly scientific care in at least thirty-two preparatory drawings and paintings. The scene depicted is an island in the Seine where working-class Parisians strolled, relaxed, and fished on Sundays. In a letter of 1890, Seurat states that he began work on the final canvas about August 15, 1884. In October 1885 he met Camille Pissarro and, following his advice, repainted the canvas using pigments that by 1892 had begun to lose their brilliance. The present study provides, therefore, a record of the chromatic intensity which the artist intended to achieve in the full-scale painting. As in the final work, the sketch juxtaposes contrasting pigments and depends on optical mixture—the phenomenon that causes two tones seen at a distance to form a single hue—to create the desired effect. Seurat based his knowledge of the science of color on the technical treatises of M. E. Chevreuil ("On the Law of the Simultaneous Contrast of Colors," 1839) and O. N. Rood ("Modern Chromatics," 1879). In this sketch, the pigments are woven together with small, patchy brushstrokes, while in the final painting Seurat used the small dots characteristic of his pointillist technique. After the sketch was finished, he restretched the canvas and added the border at the edge.
(http://michla2000.tripod.com/nycity.html)




    Reference: http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/fnart/fa257/color_notes.htm...
Brigitte Gendebien
Belgium
Local time: 08:14
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 98
Grading comment
Thanks indeed for your assistance. My apologies for taking so long to get back to you, but I was waiting for my customer to send me the explanatory fax that I was promised when I queried this expression. As often happens however, the more I waited, the less the fax arrived. In the end I scrubbed the entire concept from the transalation and appended a note to that effect. Thanks Angela for your pointer to a site of relevance to "Chevrenil", but given the scarcity of hits and the fact that my customer did mumble something about "colour theory" on the phone, I've decided to choose Brigitte's very diligent answer. If I ever do get any intelligible feedback from these people, I promise I will pass it on to you.
Thanks again
Derek
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 days
M.E. Chevreul


Explanation:
See:
1832
Chevreul describes simultaneous color contrast
(http://www.rpi.edu/~ruiz/stereo_history/text/visionsc.html)

Simultaneous contrast The phenomenon in which the perceived color of an area of a scene tends to take on a hue opposite to that of the surrounding area. Thus a grey square on a red background will take on a greenish tint.
(http://tigger.uic.edu/~hilbert/Glossary.html)


http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/color3.html
http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/book3.html#chevreul
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0887400906/002-037755...


    Reference: http://psychlab1.hanover.edu/classes/Sensation/SimultaneousC...
    Reference: http://www.ucc.uconn.edu/~wwwphil/looks.html
Brigitte Gendebien
Belgium
Local time: 08:14
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 98
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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