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Yoi no kuchi

English translation: early evening

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:yoi no kuchi
English translation:early evening
Entered by: ProZ.com Staff
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15:44 Feb 8, 2001
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Japanese term or phrase: Yoi no kuchi
What does this phrase mean, and what is the difference between this phrase and 'yuugata'?

I know yuugata means 'evening', but I heard yoi no kuchi used to describe the evening, after dusk.

Could you provide a little more info please?

Thanks!
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 16:39
Yoi no kuchi comes after yuugata.
Explanation:
There is a diffence in time.

Yuugata refers to "late afternoon" or about the time that the sun sets.

Yoi no kuchi refers to "evening" or to be more precise, the time right after the sun has set.

Therefore, yuugata can denote a time when the sun is still visible, however yoi no kuchi would be after the sun has actually set.

If you have any questions, email me: yosh@imag.net
Selected response from:

Pro-Japanese
Canada
Local time: 17:39
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone for their replies.

Troy

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nabut the night is still young
Maynard Hogg
natwilightbgccb
naYuugata comes first - then Yoino-kuchi, early part of nightHaruko Watanabe
naYoi no kuchi refers to "early evening" or "early part of the night".Chie Schaffer
nathe night is still young
Thomas Blasejewicz
naYoi no kuchi comes after yuugata.Pro-Japanese


  

Answers


29 mins
Yoi no kuchi comes after yuugata.


Explanation:
There is a diffence in time.

Yuugata refers to "late afternoon" or about the time that the sun sets.

Yoi no kuchi refers to "evening" or to be more precise, the time right after the sun has set.

Therefore, yuugata can denote a time when the sun is still visible, however yoi no kuchi would be after the sun has actually set.

If you have any questions, email me: yosh@imag.net


    Koujien.
Pro-Japanese
Canada
Local time: 17:39
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 79
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone for their replies.

Troy

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Maynard Hogg

Louise Vaux
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2 hrs
the night is still young


Explanation:
I agree with the above given explanation.Terming this as "the night is still young" should help to image what is meant. Having a drink with someone in the late afternoon is fine, but enjoying your drink "while the night is still young, but it is not yet really late (like after midnight)" suggests a lot more style, fun, romance etc.
Hope this helps.
Thomas

Thomas Blasejewicz
Japan
Local time: 09:39
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 33

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Maynard Hogg

Pro-Japanese
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2 hrs
Yoi no kuchi refers to "early evening" or "early part of the night".


Explanation:
I agree with Yosh that "yuugata" refers to the hours around the time of sunset.
"Yoi", according to Kenkyusha's Japanese-English dictionary, means early evening or early hours of the night.
"Kuchi" in this expression means "beginning". So, "yoi no kuchi" means "early evening" or "early part of the night".


    Kenkyusha's New Japanese-English Dictionary
Chie Schaffer

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Maynard Hogg

Pro-Japanese
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8 hrs
Yuugata comes first - then Yoino-kuchi, early part of night


Explanation:
I agree with all the answers above - just trying to recap here.

According to Daijirin (URL shown below),
Yuugata = All hours from the time the sun starts setting to the time it is completely set
Yoinokuchi = Hours right after sunset

This is how 'Yugata' and 'Yoinokuchi' differs, and I agree 'the night is still young' is what 'yoinokuchi' is about.
However, one question seems to remain here - are the words 'evening' and 'yugata' really equivalent?
Never mind.
Thanks for the interesting question.


    Reference: http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/cgi-bin/jp-top.cgi
Haruko Watanabe
Japan
Local time: 09:39
PRO pts in pair: 63

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Pro-Japanese
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10 days
but the night is still young


Explanation:
I favor Nyuwa's gloss because I have only heard the expression "yoi no kuchi" in expressions like まだ宵の口じゃないですか even after midnight!

As usual context is everything. If you don't have one of these expressions, go with the literal glosses given.

Maynard Hogg
Canada
Local time: 16:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 478

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Pro-Japanese
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180 days
twilight


Explanation:
The night has just begun...

bgccb
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