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強もち合い

English translation: firm bull bear position with upward tendency

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:強もち合い
English translation:firm bull bear position with upward tendency
Entered by: Timothy Takemoto
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17:40 Jan 3, 2002
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
Japanese term or phrase: 強もち合い
欧州市場の日本株は、
Junco
United States
Local time: 20:58
(well matched) bull bear position or tug of war between bulls and bears
Explanation:
In the Koujien "mochiai" is given as
(取引用語)相場が、一定の小範囲を上下するだけの状態にあること。
The state of affairs when the market value is fluctuating within a small range.

This relates to the original meaning which is
力関係のつり合いが保たれていること。
"A balance of power which is being maintained"

At the alc online dictionary below
http://www.alc.co.jp/
mochiai is given as a "bull-bear position"

This sounds very appropriate but it is very rarely used. On the Net I could only find the following one web site.
http://csf.colorado.edu/pen-l/2000I/msg02424.html

The general idea is that there is both buying and selling causing the price to fluctuate only slightly.

There are yowai and tuyoi versions of this -

日経平均も弱もち合いに推移した
http://www.kabutocho.co.jp/backup/2001/02/13/top.html

畜産前場=ブロイラーは強もち合い
http://money.genex.co.jp/price/gxreport.htm

異形棒鋼はメーカーの強気姿勢に変化がなく強含みもち合い商状。
http://www2a.biglobe.ne.jp/‾kugiman/infodb/shikyou/010202.htm


So it would seem that the strength and weakness is not a measure of the fluctuation (in both cases not a lot) but a measure of the strength of the pull in both directions.

A "firm" market does not seem to catch this meaning since a market can be firm if it simply does not move, even when there is little trading and no bulls or bears. E.g. the following market which was firm simply due to a shortage of liquidity.
http://www.indiainfoline.com/mufu/mkve/cha4.html

There is nothing to suggest that the market is rising either.

After much consideration, checking three online financial terms dictionaries in vain, I think I would go for

"a tug of war between bulls and bears"
You might want to add "(fierce but) well matched."

E.g. There was a tug of war between bulls and bears over Japanese stocks on the European Markets.

This is used frequently to descripe a market with downward and upward pressure
which is often fluctuating. (Hence the need for the "well-matched" or "non-volatile")
E.g.
http://www.internetstockreport.com/column/article/0,,1661_87...
http://www.stockcharts.com/commentary/richardr/richardr20010...
http://www.gold-eagle.com/gold_digest_98/droke081798.html
http://www.thestreet.com/comment/wrongrear/1128525.html




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-04 09:21:20 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This page, describing a damped zig zag as a ¥"Sankaku mochiai¥" with a diagram may be useful
http://www.hadou.net/hadoubunseki/hadoubunseki_syokusanju.ht...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-04 12:13:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

But this page says that ¥"mochiai banare¥" leaving a ¥"mochiai¥" is the signs of increase from a stable (hence mochiai) position. This would seem to suggest that mochiai is just a balanced market.

http://melma.odn.ne.jp/mag/45/m00031845/a00000004.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-09 02:53:20 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

I think that jnfassoc¥'s answer below, but perhaps there is no clear corresponding term.
Selected response from:

Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 10:58
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1firmer; gaining; unchanged; to slightly higher
Philip Soldini
5firm (steady) with an upward tendencyjnfassoc
4(well matched) bull bear position or tug of war between bulls and bears
Timothy Takemoto


  

Answers


8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
firmer; gaining; unchanged; to slightly higher


Explanation:
According to one of my financial dictionaries, this term can mean any one of the following depending on the context:

firmer; gaining; unchanged; to slightly higher

It seems the sentence you tried to copy was cut short so I can't tell which one would be most appropriate in your case.


    The Dictionary of Securities Insurance & Financial Terms
Philip Soldini
Local time: 10:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 42

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.): growing firmer; Japaese uses harmless words to beneficiary to avoid claims.
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
(well matched) bull bear position or tug of war between bulls and bears


Explanation:
In the Koujien "mochiai" is given as
(取引用語)相場が、一定の小範囲を上下するだけの状態にあること。
The state of affairs when the market value is fluctuating within a small range.

This relates to the original meaning which is
力関係のつり合いが保たれていること。
"A balance of power which is being maintained"

At the alc online dictionary below
http://www.alc.co.jp/
mochiai is given as a "bull-bear position"

This sounds very appropriate but it is very rarely used. On the Net I could only find the following one web site.
http://csf.colorado.edu/pen-l/2000I/msg02424.html

The general idea is that there is both buying and selling causing the price to fluctuate only slightly.

There are yowai and tuyoi versions of this -

日経平均も弱もち合いに推移した
http://www.kabutocho.co.jp/backup/2001/02/13/top.html

畜産前場=ブロイラーは強もち合い
http://money.genex.co.jp/price/gxreport.htm

異形棒鋼はメーカーの強気姿勢に変化がなく強含みもち合い商状。
http://www2a.biglobe.ne.jp/‾kugiman/infodb/shikyou/010202.htm


So it would seem that the strength and weakness is not a measure of the fluctuation (in both cases not a lot) but a measure of the strength of the pull in both directions.

A "firm" market does not seem to catch this meaning since a market can be firm if it simply does not move, even when there is little trading and no bulls or bears. E.g. the following market which was firm simply due to a shortage of liquidity.
http://www.indiainfoline.com/mufu/mkve/cha4.html

There is nothing to suggest that the market is rising either.

After much consideration, checking three online financial terms dictionaries in vain, I think I would go for

"a tug of war between bulls and bears"
You might want to add "(fierce but) well matched."

E.g. There was a tug of war between bulls and bears over Japanese stocks on the European Markets.

This is used frequently to descripe a market with downward and upward pressure
which is often fluctuating. (Hence the need for the "well-matched" or "non-volatile")
E.g.
http://www.internetstockreport.com/column/article/0,,1661_87...
http://www.stockcharts.com/commentary/richardr/richardr20010...
http://www.gold-eagle.com/gold_digest_98/droke081798.html
http://www.thestreet.com/comment/wrongrear/1128525.html




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-04 09:21:20 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This page, describing a damped zig zag as a ¥"Sankaku mochiai¥" with a diagram may be useful
http://www.hadou.net/hadoubunseki/hadoubunseki_syokusanju.ht...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-04 12:13:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

But this page says that ¥"mochiai banare¥" leaving a ¥"mochiai¥" is the signs of increase from a stable (hence mochiai) position. This would seem to suggest that mochiai is just a balanced market.

http://melma.odn.ne.jp/mag/45/m00031845/a00000004.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-09 02:53:20 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

I think that jnfassoc¥'s answer below, but perhaps there is no clear corresponding term.

Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 10:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 65
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 days 20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
firm (steady) with an upward tendency


Explanation:
Refer to the 'New Japanese-English Dictionary of Economic Terms' (The Oriental Economist)

jnfassoc
PRO pts in pair: 24
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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