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お疲れ様です

English translation: "Goodnight"; "You must be tired"; "That's all" (see notes)

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20:32 Aug 12, 2004
Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general)
Japanese term or phrase: お疲れ様です
Just curious as to how people typically translate a standard cultural phrase like this that is common in business parlance.
Steven Battisti
United States
Local time: 17:54
English translation:"Goodnight"; "You must be tired"; "That's all" (see notes)
Explanation:
A phrase like this is very contextual and has many different meanings depending on the situation in which its used.

Some typical usages are:

"thank you for your work" (at the conclusion of a class)
"that's all for today"
"have a good evening" (when leaving the office or a meeting)
"well done!"

There are countless other ways to translate this relatively simple phrase. The best you can do is to get a feel for the context and make an appropriate choice based on your experience. (Other pros, please disagree, if you must!)

If you have a particular phrase or situation in mind preceeding お疲れ様, posting it would give us context within which to answer your question.
Selected response from:

Dorian Kenleigh
United States
Local time: 17:54
Grading comment
This is great, all. Thanks! It would be cool to have a list of these difficult phrases!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3"Goodnight"; "You must be tired"; "That's all" (see notes)
Dorian Kenleigh


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
お疲れ様です
"Goodnight"; "You must be tired"; "That's all" (see notes)


Explanation:
A phrase like this is very contextual and has many different meanings depending on the situation in which its used.

Some typical usages are:

"thank you for your work" (at the conclusion of a class)
"that's all for today"
"have a good evening" (when leaving the office or a meeting)
"well done!"

There are countless other ways to translate this relatively simple phrase. The best you can do is to get a feel for the context and make an appropriate choice based on your experience. (Other pros, please disagree, if you must!)

If you have a particular phrase or situation in mind preceeding お疲れ様, posting it would give us context within which to answer your question.

Dorian Kenleigh
United States
Local time: 17:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
This is great, all. Thanks! It would be cool to have a list of these difficult phrases!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  conejo: Yes, there are so many ways this could be translated depending on the situation. It could even be something like, "Wow, you worked hard today." For me the connotation has to do with working hard, and expressing sympathy... there's no exact translation.
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  xxxAndrew Wille: This is perhaps one of the most difficult phrases to get the grasp of. I am still astounded by the apparent flexibility お世話になります aswell. IMO the best thing to do is relate them to feelings, images, and situations, as opposed to translations.
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  xxxanrisa: Perhaps there should be a list on this, which will also include よろしく、よろしくお願いします.
2 hrs
  -> The first Japanese textbook I used, by Elanor Harz Jordan, has a whole chapter on phrases like this called "Greetings and Useful Phrases". The text was called "Japanese the Spoken Language" check it out.
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