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Kaze To Tomo Ni Sarinu

English translation: the easiest way...

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:Kaze To Tomo Ni Sarinu
English translation:the easiest way...
Entered by: spanruss
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20:53 Sep 12, 2007
Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
Japanese term or phrase: Kaze To Tomo Ni Sarinu
How would you pronounce this? I have an actor friend in a play about "Gone with the Wind", who needs to know how to pronounce this in several languages.
spanruss
United States
Local time: 20:37
the easiest way...
Explanation:
Hi SpanRuss - since you obviously speak Spanish, I would simply suggest that you pronounce it as if it were Spanish - Japanese is completely phonetic(*), just like Spanish - and teach your colleague that way.

The syllable breakdown is as follows:
Ka/ze/to/to/mo/ni/sa/ri/nu

(*) OK, there are some exceptions to my generalization of Japanese being "completely" phonetic, but in this example, there are no tricky bits to worry about at all.
Selected response from:

KathyT
Australia
Local time: 11:37
Grading comment
Thx, Kathy
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4the easiest way...
KathyT
4 +2as below
Kurt Hammond
4 +1as belowSteven F Smith


  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
as below


Explanation:
Rhythmically, every syllable has the same length. All the vowels are short, no diphthongs.

Ka somewhere between cat/cut;
ze as in zed.
to as in top,
mo as in mop,
ni as in nit (a short knee really)
sa as in sat
ri somewhere between rip and reap
nu as in noose, but shorter.

Note that the 'r' is pronounced with the blade of the tongue striking the palate, almost like a cross between 'd' and 'l'.

Steven F Smith
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yo Mizuno
2 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
as below


Explanation:
I have to post this reply because I disagree with the example sounds Steven has suggested.

"o" sounds nothing like "mop" or "top" for example, regardless of British or American pronunciation.

Ka - A is pronounced like the "a" in "after" (American English)
Ze - E is pronounced like "get"
To - O is pronounced like "o" in "rope"
mo - (o pronounced like above)
ni - i pronounced like 'ea' in "eat"
sa - a pronounced like "a" in the above "Ka"
ri - "i" as above, R as noted by Steven - it is very close to a 'd' sound and you could almost substitute for a d sound and people might not even notice.
nu - "u" pronounced like "oo" in "shoot" but draw your lips out to the sides more (leave tongue, teeth and lip middle position the same.)

Kurt Hammond
United States
Local time: 18:37
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  KNielsen
6 hrs

neutral  Steven F Smith: I just can't imagine to tomo sounding like toe toe mow. The o of rope is a diphthong to my ears.// We are sadly deficient in 0-type monophthongs!
9 hrs
  -> Agreed. I am having trouble thinking of a monopthong 'o' sound in English. Is there one? Santa's 'ho ho ho' perhaps?

neutral  conejo: Hmm, "A" as in "after"?? Wouldn't it be "A" as in "father"??
13 hrs
  -> Maybe if you have a Boston accent... :-)

agree  xxxJazzgirl: I agreed :)
1 day3 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
the easiest way...


Explanation:
Hi SpanRuss - since you obviously speak Spanish, I would simply suggest that you pronounce it as if it were Spanish - Japanese is completely phonetic(*), just like Spanish - and teach your colleague that way.

The syllable breakdown is as follows:
Ka/ze/to/to/mo/ni/sa/ri/nu

(*) OK, there are some exceptions to my generalization of Japanese being "completely" phonetic, but in this example, there are no tricky bits to worry about at all.

KathyT
Australia
Local time: 11:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
Grading comment
Thx, Kathy

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nobuo Kameyama: Si, convengo con usted.
3 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias! ;-)

agree  Kurt Hammond: didn't notice that. Yes, Japanese vowels (and most consonants) are roughly identical to spanish vowels (and most consonants).
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Kurt.

agree  sigmalanguage: Very nice idea! Ingenious.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, sigmalanguage.

agree  conejo: There ya go! This is the best explanation of the sounds by far. De acuerdo. Also, Japanese has less ups and downs in the intonation than Spanish, so if you pronounce it on more of an even keel, with the sounds the same as Spanish, you should be very close
13 hrs
  -> Muy amable, gracias ;-)
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