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gravity plane

English translation: 重力平面

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07:25 Nov 17, 2008
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Engineering (general)
Japanese term or phrase: gravity plane
The term appears in a numbered list - here's the whole item: "Define the zero z-plane as the gravity plane at the average height of the 3 laser targets."

This author has propensity for using more words than necessary to express simple concepts (not unlike someone else, who I know rather intimately *wink, wink*), so I'm leaning towards treating "gravity" here as superfluous and translating it as just 表面.

I couldn't find any English description or definition of "gravity plane" - Internet searches yield only pages referring to some new type or aircraft. Should I follow my instinct and translate it as 表面, or does a better translation exist? All help will be greatly appreciated, as always.
Krzysztof Łesyk
Japan
Local time: 16:12
English translation:重力平面
Explanation:
Hello Krzysztof! How are things?

Anyways, I would refrain from leaving out 重力, as this is a fairly important piece of information in the term here.

This makes sense...a gravity plane simply describes a two-dimensional field of gravitational force. Imagine slicing the Earth (or any large celestial body) right down the middle with an imaginary two-dimensional plane. The force of gravity would vary at points along the plane depending on their distance from the earth's center.

Since this is talking about laser heights and Z-values (typically used to describe vertical coordinates), its pretty clear to me that the sentence is talking about gravitational force along a two-dimensional vertical plane.

So, in Japanese, this would simply translate as 重力平面.

...hope this helps.
Selected response from:

Troy Fowler
United States
Local time: 00:12
Grading comment
The deadline for this translation is today, so I will follow your suggestion and go with 重力平面, even though the number of hits on google for this phrase is rather small (yes, I did read the thread on overgoogleification of our profession, but... ;)). Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4重力平面
Troy Fowler


Discussion entries: 1





  

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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
重力平面


Explanation:
Hello Krzysztof! How are things?

Anyways, I would refrain from leaving out 重力, as this is a fairly important piece of information in the term here.

This makes sense...a gravity plane simply describes a two-dimensional field of gravitational force. Imagine slicing the Earth (or any large celestial body) right down the middle with an imaginary two-dimensional plane. The force of gravity would vary at points along the plane depending on their distance from the earth's center.

Since this is talking about laser heights and Z-values (typically used to describe vertical coordinates), its pretty clear to me that the sentence is talking about gravitational force along a two-dimensional vertical plane.

So, in Japanese, this would simply translate as 重力平面.

...hope this helps.

Troy Fowler
United States
Local time: 00:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 30
Grading comment
The deadline for this translation is today, so I will follow your suggestion and go with 重力平面, even though the number of hits on google for this phrase is rather small (yes, I did read the thread on overgoogleification of our profession, but... ;)). Thanks!
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