KudoZ home » Japanese to English » Meteorology

現地気圧

English translation: station pressure

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
23:08 Feb 22, 2012
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Meteorology / meteorology
Japanese term or phrase: 現地気圧
Does anyone know what to translate 現地 into English?
Thanks in advance for your help!
xxxyuri777
Local time: 09:32
English translation:station pressure
Explanation:
現地 itself can be many things, depending on the context: local, on-site, on-the-spot, in the field etc.
With 現地気圧,I believe, station pressure can be used if it refers to the pressure measured at the actual measuring station of the location in question. Otherwise maybe local (atmospheric) pressure?
Selected response from:

MalteLaurids
Local time: 03:32
Grading comment
Thanks for your help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +4local atmospheric pressureJulian Rippon
3station pressureMalteLaurids
Summary of reference entries provided
FYI
cinefil

  

Answers


44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
station pressure


Explanation:
現地 itself can be many things, depending on the context: local, on-site, on-the-spot, in the field etc.
With 現地気圧,I believe, station pressure can be used if it refers to the pressure measured at the actual measuring station of the location in question. Otherwise maybe local (atmospheric) pressure?


    Reference: http://ejje.weblio.jp/content/%E7%8F%BE%E5%9C%B0%E6%B0%97%E5...
    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_pressure
MalteLaurids
Local time: 03:32
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks for your help!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
local atmospheric pressure


Explanation:
Without any more context it's rather difficult to be sure, but this would seem to be a reasonable guess. I see that MalteLaurids suggests this as a possibility too.

If the asker could provide the context for the term then it would be easier to give a more definitive answer.

Julian Rippon
Local time: 02:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Seow Boon Tay
14 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  xxxMariyaN
23 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Shobhana Chandu
4 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  Harumi Uemura
2 days3 hrs
  -> Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


2 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: FYI

Reference information:
http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/kishou/know/faq/faq5.html
http://sciterm.nii.ac.jp/cgi-bin/list.cgi
https://www.cs.drexel.edu/~dbrooks/globe/pressure.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2012-02-23 03:23:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

BAROMETRIC PRESSURE

In the U.S., air pressure at the surface is reported in inches of mercury while air pressure aloft is reported in millibars. However, scientists generally use pressures in millibars. Millibars are a direct measure of pressure, like pounds per square inch, but in the metric system. Inches of mercury measure how high the pressure pushes the mercury in a barometer. To convert between inches of mercury and millibars, one millibar is equal to 0.03 inches of mercury.

The direct reading from a barometer is the station pressure. Two things affect this barometer reading, the high and low pressure caused by weather systems and the change in pressure caused by the station's elevation. No matter what the weather systems are doing, air pressure decreases with height. That is why it is important to examine a uniform pressure field by reducing it to sea level.

Sea-level pressure is defined as: "A pressure value obtained by the theoretical reduction of barometric pressure to sea level." Another kind of barometric reading is the altimeter setting, which aircraft use. It's defined as: "The pressure value to which an aircraft altimeter scale is set so that it will indicate the altitude above mean sea level of an aircraft on the ground at that location." A rule of thumb for the altimeter correction is that the pressure drops about 1 inch of mercury for each 1000 foot altitude gain. And if using millibars, the correction is 1 millibar for each 8 meters of altitude gain. These rules of thumb work pretty well for elevations or altitudes of less than a two or three thousand feet.
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/otx/outreach/ttalk/baropres.php

cinefil
Japan
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  naruru
172 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search