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ヤクザ

English translation: yakuza

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:ヤクザ
English translation:yakuza
Entered by: R. A. Stegemann
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09:11 Oct 19, 2002
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
/ Political economy
Japanese term or phrase: ヤクザ
Everyone who knows anything about Japan has heard of the ヤクザ.

They are a group of Japanese citizens with a long history of organized exploitation. They exist in Japanese society because Japanese political and business leaders find their presence convenient. When certain deeds are awkward to achieve within the conventional Japanese legal and political framework, Japanese leaders hire the ヤクザ to achieve their goals extra-legally.

So as to protect their self-interest these organized gangs of criminals often hide behind Japanese tradition and legitimate business activities. As individual Japanese tend toward social harmony on the one hand, and find little protection in this regard from Japanese law enforcement officers on the other, the ヤクザ persist.

Those who support those who condemn the ヤクザ on the one hand, but support the activities of the ヤクザ on the other, cannot be trusted. They feign political compromise and social harmony, but in fact contribute to social disharmony, continued secrecy, and political corruption.

I have sometimes seen the term ヤクザ translated as the "Japanese mafia". Are there other expressions that I have not seen?

Your further cooperation and assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,

Hamo
R. A. Stegemann
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 22:08
yakuza or Japanese ganster
Explanation:
I think it's fair to say that the term Yakuza and its meaning are widely recognised, especially in the States. Otherwise, Japanese gangster is another appropriate expression. I don't like to use the term Mafia in describing Yazuka because it specifically refers to Sicilian gansters.

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Note added at 2002-10-19 09:27:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ooops.. . misspelled GANGSTER!

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Note added at 2002-10-19 09:38:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ooops.. . misspelled GANGSTER!
Selected response from:

xxxAnneF
Local time: 22:08
Grading comment
I would like to thank both Anne and Daisuke for reminding me that the term "yakuza" has become an English loan word.

I wish more discussion had been given with regard to the use of italics in this case, as it is my belief that loan words require no italics -- only foreign words that have not yet been formally recognized as part of the language.

I also wish more discussion had been provided with regard to the term Japanese mafia. I find little wrong with this term, as it describes one nation's version of another's already well-known form of organized crime. The mafia became well-known in the United States long before the yakuza. For example, would it be wrong to say Italian yakuza when talking in English to a Japanese about the mafia.

In any case I thank you all for your assistance.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6yakuza or Japanese gansterxxxAnneF
4Japanese Mafia or italicized "yakuza"xxxjsl


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
yakuza or Japanese ganster


Explanation:
I think it's fair to say that the term Yakuza and its meaning are widely recognised, especially in the States. Otherwise, Japanese gangster is another appropriate expression. I don't like to use the term Mafia in describing Yazuka because it specifically refers to Sicilian gansters.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-19 09:27:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ooops.. . misspelled GANGSTER!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-19 09:38:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ooops.. . misspelled GANGSTER!

xxxAnneF
Local time: 22:08
PRO pts in pair: 19
Grading comment
I would like to thank both Anne and Daisuke for reminding me that the term "yakuza" has become an English loan word.

I wish more discussion had been given with regard to the use of italics in this case, as it is my belief that loan words require no italics -- only foreign words that have not yet been formally recognized as part of the language.

I also wish more discussion had been provided with regard to the term Japanese mafia. I find little wrong with this term, as it describes one nation's version of another's already well-known form of organized crime. The mafia became well-known in the United States long before the yakuza. For example, would it be wrong to say Italian yakuza when talking in English to a Japanese about the mafia.

In any case I thank you all for your assistance.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Naomi Ota
2 mins

agree  Hidenori Nakamura
1 hr

agree  Emily Horner
2 hrs

agree  ejprotran
8 hrs

agree  yamamoto
13 hrs

agree  amit vats
30 days
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Japanese Mafia or italicized "yakuza"


Explanation:
If you don't want to use "yakuza" without translating it, I will suggest "Japanese Mafia"

If you want to use "yakuza", I will italicize it, since I don't think it is part of the English vocabulary to the extent that "kimono" is so.


xxxjsl
Local time: 22:08
PRO pts in pair: 1098
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