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オカピー

English translation: Okapie, Okapy (used as a nickname)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:オカピー
English translation:Okapie, Okapy (used as a nickname)
Entered by: xxxjsl
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08:28 Jan 24, 2003
Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Japanese term or phrase: オカピー
Is this even a valid Japanese word? Thanks.
jogloran
used as a nickname
Explanation:
For your original question, the answer will be "Yes" and "No". For the "No" part, there is no such a common name for a common thing in Japanse, but, for the "Yes" part, it can be used as a nickname for a person whose name has "oka" somewhere.

In Japanese, there are diminutive forms, such as "-chan". The purpose of this diminutive form is to make the name sound cuter. Examples are Koo-chan, Dai-chan, Yuki-chan, Haru-chan, etc, and, as you see, two hiragana characters (technically speaking, two morae) are followed by the diminutive. Instead of saying "Yukiko", "Yuki-chan" sounds much cuter and more friendlier.

Like "-chan", "-pii" recently functions as a diminutive in Japanese, as well as "-chin", "-buu", etc, and "Oka-pii" is a diminutive form for people whose name have "oka" in it. It could be used for Okada, Okamoto, Okano, etc. In fact, a young famous Japanese comedian, Takashi Okamura, was called "Oka-pii" in one of his comedy programs.

For the spelling, following the English spelling system, people would write "Okapy" or "Okapie". I used "Oka-pii" here by the Hepburn system just to show the closer sound.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-24 10:26:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The animal ¥"okapi¥" is written ¥"オカピ¥", not ¥"オカピー¥". You can see the difference from here:

http://www.google.com/search?q=IJs -IJs[
Selected response from:

xxxjsl
Local time: 13:01
Grading comment
Ah yes. I thought that the animal okapi didn't fit the context. It turns out it was referring to the comedian Takashi Okamura you mentioned. Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4used as a nickname
xxxjsl
1okapi
horse


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
okapi


Explanation:
This is a zebra like animal living in Africa. Is your text in any way animal related or Africa related ?

horse
Local time: 13:01
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 33

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxjsl: The animal is called "オカピ", not "オカピー".
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
used as a nickname


Explanation:
For your original question, the answer will be "Yes" and "No". For the "No" part, there is no such a common name for a common thing in Japanse, but, for the "Yes" part, it can be used as a nickname for a person whose name has "oka" somewhere.

In Japanese, there are diminutive forms, such as "-chan". The purpose of this diminutive form is to make the name sound cuter. Examples are Koo-chan, Dai-chan, Yuki-chan, Haru-chan, etc, and, as you see, two hiragana characters (technically speaking, two morae) are followed by the diminutive. Instead of saying "Yukiko", "Yuki-chan" sounds much cuter and more friendlier.

Like "-chan", "-pii" recently functions as a diminutive in Japanese, as well as "-chin", "-buu", etc, and "Oka-pii" is a diminutive form for people whose name have "oka" in it. It could be used for Okada, Okamoto, Okano, etc. In fact, a young famous Japanese comedian, Takashi Okamura, was called "Oka-pii" in one of his comedy programs.

For the spelling, following the English spelling system, people would write "Okapy" or "Okapie". I used "Oka-pii" here by the Hepburn system just to show the closer sound.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-24 10:26:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The animal ¥"okapi¥" is written ¥"オカピ¥", not ¥"オカピー¥". You can see the difference from here:

http://www.google.com/search?q=IJs -IJs[



    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?q=%83I%83J%83s%81%5B
xxxjsl
Local time: 13:01
PRO pts in pair: 1098
Grading comment
Ah yes. I thought that the animal okapi didn't fit the context. It turns out it was referring to the comedian Takashi Okamura you mentioned. Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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