KudoZ home » Japanese to English » Other

Johno is a loser

English translation: ジョノは負け犬[敗者]だ

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:Johno is a loser
English translation:ジョノは負け犬[敗者]だ
Entered by: xxxjsl
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

18:26 Dec 15, 2003
Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Japanese term or phrase: Johno is a loser
I want to call my friend a loser and how do i say it.
Travis
ジョノは負け犬[敗者]だ
Explanation:
ジョノは負け犬[敗者]だ: Jono wa makeinu [haisha] da.

"loser" is usually translated as "負け犬" (makeinu, literally meaning "losing dog"). "敗者" (haisha) is a more general term that means "one who has lost".


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-16 11:24:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Johno may be ¥"城野¥" (joono).
Selected response from:

xxxjsl
Local time: 02:49
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +5ジョノは負け犬[敗者]だxxxjsl
5 +1城野は敗北者だMumu Watanabe
5城野は負け癖がついてる
Nobuo Kawamura
3 +1じょうのは胸くそが悪いやつだ。
satoko takiguchi


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
ジョノは負け犬[敗者]だ


Explanation:
ジョノは負け犬[敗者]だ: Jono wa makeinu [haisha] da.

"loser" is usually translated as "負け犬" (makeinu, literally meaning "losing dog"). "敗者" (haisha) is a more general term that means "one who has lost".


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-16 11:24:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Johno may be ¥"城野¥" (joono).


xxxjsl
Local time: 02:49
PRO pts in pair: 1098
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: prefer 'makeinu' but 'haisha' is also acceptable.
15 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Immo
12 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  Kurt Hammond: make inu, assuming you are speaking colloquially and pessimistically
15 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  Kaori Myatt
1 day 14 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  seika: makeinu is a good expression, since "loser" doesn't have to mean a person who lost a fight/game.race,etc...
3 days 30 mins
  -> thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
城野は敗北者だ


Explanation:
城野は敗北者だ:Johno wa haibokusya da

This translation gives a decisive impression.

If you don't mind giving a rude impression, you can say as below.

城野は負け犬野郎だ:Johno ha makeinu-yarou da

Mumu Watanabe
Local time: 02:49
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: like the 'yaroo' suffix.
13 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
城野は負け癖がついてる


Explanation:
The translation varies depending on what the speaker wants to do for this frequently losing person
負け犬is a discouraging statement whereas 負け癖がついているis more objective observation possibly leading to some subsequet words of encouragement.

Nobuo Kawamura
Japan
Local time: 02:49
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 483
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
じょうのは胸くそが悪いやつだ。


Explanation:
Johno wa munakusoga waruiyatu da.

Of course, literally "loser" means "makeinu" or "haisya" which means someone who has lost, but in English if you use this phrase to someone, it means that person is annoying person and doesn't have any popularity.

satoko takiguchi
Japan
Local time: 02:49
Native speaker of: Japanese
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: but prefer to spell them as 'yatsu' and 'haisha' use of Kunreishiki often leads to mispronounciation by foreigners.
10 hrs
  -> thank you. I agree to what you said about the spelling.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search