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sensei

English translation: "leader"

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21:13 Feb 17, 2000
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Japanese term or phrase: sensei
"Of course, Sensei."
Rice Nanasaki
English translation:"leader"
Explanation:
The term "sensei" refers in Japanese to persons of respect and/or leadership.
These include school teachers, teachers of martial arts, doctors, politicians (!?) and some other kinds of people.
In modern times this is just a polite addressing, while in the traditional way (martial arts etc.) the term includes the concept of "spiritual leader".

Literally it means "living before (others)" - in the meaning of "an example to others".
Since I personally are also referred to as "sensei", I always try to live up to function as an example to others - which certainly is not very easy.
Selected response from:

Thomas Blasejewicz
Japan
Local time: 14:46
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2Teacher, Mentor, or MasterSadao Sasaki
na +1teacher or, my teacherGwendolyn Satoh
na +1teacher
Henry Dotterer
naMister X or sir
Maynard Hogg
naSenseixxxsimaya
nasirJames Phillips
naSIRxxxLenore
na"leader"
Thomas Blasejewicz


  

Answers


9 mins peer agreement (net): +1
teacher or, my teacher


Explanation:
Translating this as 'teacher' still may sound unnnatural. In English I think we would usually substitute the teacher's name. As in, "Of course, Mr. Smith."

Gwendolyn Satoh
Local time: 14:46

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mami Y.
5235 days
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13 mins
SIR


Explanation:
Depending on the situation & era of what you are translating, I have found that "sir" often substitutes nicely. Of course, "master," "teacher" and such can also be used, but "sir" tends to offer a similar flexibility that "sensei" does.

xxxLenore
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20 mins peer agreement (net): +1
teacher


Explanation:
Most often used literally as "teacher", but can be used in colloquial conversation as a compliment--sincere or sarcastic--ala "right you are, professor", or "no sh$#, Sherlock."

Henry Dotterer
United States
Local time: 01:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mami Y.
5235 days
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29 mins
sir


Explanation:
Would need more context to be certain but this would appear to be "sir". This may very depending on the country in which the conversation is set. "Sir" would be OK for the UK. Can anyone from the US tell me how a student over there usually responds to a teacher?


    Reference: http://www.rdt.monash.edu.au/~jwb/wwwjdic.html
James Phillips
Local time: 14:46
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45 mins peer agreement (net): +2
Teacher, Mentor, or Master


Explanation:
Sensei is used to address someone who is respected by an individual, groups, community or society. It is an informal title. Anyone can be called Sensei if he/she earns this title.

Sensei can be someone who is a teacher by profession or doctors, scientists, polititian or any others who have greater positive impact on others.

Sensei is pronoun, therefore, used to address someone instead of his/her name.

Sensei! I have a question. (In a classroom setting)

Sensei! What is wrong with me? (At a hospital)

Sensei! We would like to ask you if you are interested in giving a speech for us. (Great achiever)

Sadao Sasaki

Sadao Sasaki
United States
Local time: 22:46
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter
1616 days

agree  Mami Y.
5235 days
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47 mins
"leader"


Explanation:
The term "sensei" refers in Japanese to persons of respect and/or leadership.
These include school teachers, teachers of martial arts, doctors, politicians (!?) and some other kinds of people.
In modern times this is just a polite addressing, while in the traditional way (martial arts etc.) the term includes the concept of "spiritual leader".

Literally it means "living before (others)" - in the meaning of "an example to others".
Since I personally are also referred to as "sensei", I always try to live up to function as an example to others - which certainly is not very easy.


Thomas Blasejewicz
Japan
Local time: 14:46
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 33
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4 hrs
Sensei


Explanation:
Is a term of respect, usually meaning teacher, master, mentor, and so on.

It is not only used in Martial Arts as a term of respect, as many Hollywood movies have made it a fairly common word in the English language.
It is also used by school children/students in Japan to address their teacher.

xxxsimaya
Thailand
Local time: 12:46
Native speaker of: English
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3 days4 hrs
Mister X or sir


Explanation:
Forget the "born first" nonsense. In Chinese, the term after a name just means "Mister".

Maynard Hogg
Japan
Local time: 14:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 478
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