cum ballonis juxta planum

English translation: ballo, ballonis > medieval Latin for "vallis" = dale / valley

20:45 Apr 1, 2006
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Agriculture
Latin term or phrase: cum ballonis juxta planum
I'm hoping for help with the Latin word "ballonis". The Latin phrase is inserted inside an Italian phrase:
"quale si congiunge cum ballonis juxta planum S. Bartholomei " and is a description of a property boundary from about 1450.
John Nardello
English translation:ballo, ballonis > medieval Latin for "vallis" = dale / valley
Explanation:
It could be : "it merges / ends up into a dale near the plain / lowlands of...".
For the wrong usage / confusion of cases ("ballonis" is a genitive, instead of the expected ablative), it is quite common in very late Medieval Latin, especially in notary acts, as the one this sentence is taken from seems to be.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-04-02 01:25:49 GMT)
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Ballonis could also be the wrong transcritpion for the shortening of the plural ablative "balloni(bu)s", quite frequent in hand written documents.

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Note added at 11 hrs (2006-04-02 08:05:07 GMT)
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I found in the "Latinitatis Italicae Medii Aevi Lexicon" that "v(b)ballis", of which "v(b)allo,(b)allonis" is the augmentative, has the plural ablative "valis" instead of the expected "vallibus". Probably, "ballo, ballonis" follows the same exception. If so, "cum ballonis" in your sentence could mean "into dales / deep valleys"

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Note added at 11 hrs (2006-04-02 08:26:19 GMT)
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Another meaning for "v(b)allo, v(b)allonis" is "ravine, gorge", which I think it's probably the best translaton for a landmark in talking of boundaries and the plural is much more reasonable in the context.
Selected response from:

Leonardo Marcello Pignataro (X)
Local time: 20:35
Grading comment
Mille grazie! You have solved my problem.
John Nardello
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3ballo, ballonis > medieval Latin for "vallis" = dale / valley
Leonardo Marcello Pignataro (X)


  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
ballo, ballonis > medieval Latin for "vallis" = dale / valley


Explanation:
It could be : "it merges / ends up into a dale near the plain / lowlands of...".
For the wrong usage / confusion of cases ("ballonis" is a genitive, instead of the expected ablative), it is quite common in very late Medieval Latin, especially in notary acts, as the one this sentence is taken from seems to be.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2006-04-02 01:25:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ballonis could also be the wrong transcritpion for the shortening of the plural ablative "balloni(bu)s", quite frequent in hand written documents.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2006-04-02 08:05:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I found in the "Latinitatis Italicae Medii Aevi Lexicon" that "v(b)ballis", of which "v(b)allo,(b)allonis" is the augmentative, has the plural ablative "valis" instead of the expected "vallibus". Probably, "ballo, ballonis" follows the same exception. If so, "cum ballonis" in your sentence could mean "into dales / deep valleys"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2006-04-02 08:26:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another meaning for "v(b)allo, v(b)allonis" is "ravine, gorge", which I think it's probably the best translaton for a landmark in talking of boundaries and the plural is much more reasonable in the context.

Leonardo Marcello Pignataro (X)
Local time: 20:35
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Grading comment
Mille grazie! You have solved my problem.
John Nardello

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Brigitte Albert (X): Following your lead, I found this medieval link: http://www.rostra.dk/latin/opqr.html#p (vallis synonym. with planities (planitia) a flat surface or plain --there is the sense of "vallis" being enclosed, however, so I'm not 100% sure of this ...
5 hrs
  -> Hi, Brigitte! The problem with medieval Latin is that words can have different synonims in different areas. E.g., in Italian we have the noun "vallone" meaning "deep dale" coming straight from "b(v)allo, b(v)allonis" which is a late augmentative of vallis

agree  Joseph Brazauskas
18 hrs

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
6 days
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